... analysis.2.1
Testing a filter by sweeping an input sinusoid through a range of frequencies is often used in practice, especially when there might be some distortion that also needs to be measured. There are particular advantages to using exponentially swept sine-wave analysis [24], in which the sinusoidal frequency increases exponentially with respect to time. (The technique is sometimes also referred to as log-swept sine-wave analysis.) Swept-sine analysis can be viewed as a descendant of time-delay spectrometry.
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...real2.2
We may define a real filter as one whose output signal is real whenever its input signal is real.
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... sinusoid|textbf.2.3
Some authors refer to $ e^{j\omega nT}$ as a complex exponential, but it is useful to reserve that term for signals of the form $ {\cal A}r^ne^{j\omega nT}$ , where $ r>0$ . That is, complex exponentials are more generally allowed to have a non-constant exponential amplitude envelope. Note that all complex exponentials can be generated from two complex numbers, $ {\cal A}=Ae^{j\phi}$ and $ z=r e^{j\omega T}$ , viz., $ {\cal A}
z^n$ . This topic is explored further in [84].
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... Octave,3.1
Users of Matlab will also need the Signal Processing Toolbox, which is available for an additional charge. Users of Octave will also need the free ``Octave Forge'' collection, which contains functions corresponding to the Signal Processing Toolbox.
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... language.3.2
In an effort to improve the matlab language, Octave does not maintain 100% compatibility with Matlab. See http://octave.sf.net/compatibility.html for details.
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...filter3.3
Say help filter in Matlab or Octave to view the documentation. In Matlab, you can also say doc filter to view more detailed documentation in a Web browser.
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... filter:3.4
These adjectives will be defined precisely in Chapters 4 and 5.
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... 1.3.5
As we will learn in §5.1, A(1) is the coefficient of the current output sample, which is always normalized to 1. The actual feedback coefficients are $ \texttt{-A(2)}, \texttt{-A(3)},\ldots\,$ .
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...,3.6
The notation $ [a,b)$ denotes the half-open interval--the set of all real numbers between $ a$ and $ b$ , including $ a$ but not $ b$ .
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... execution.3.7
As a fine point, the fastest known FFT for power-of-2 lengths is the split-radix FFT--a hybrid of the radix-2 and radix-4 cases. See http://cnx.org/content/m12031/latest/ for more details.
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...MDFT.3.8
http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jos/mdft/
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... matlab4.1
The term ``matlab'' (uncapitalized) will refer here to either Matlab or Octave [82]. Code described as ``matlab'' should run in either environment without modification.
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... completeness.4.2
Most plots in this book are optimized for Matlab. Octave uses gnuplot which is quite different from Matlab's handle-oriented graphics. In Octave, the plots will typically be visible, but the titles and axis labels may be incorrect due to the different semantics associated with statement ordering in the two cases.
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... frequency:4.3
As always, radian frequency $ \omega$ is related to frequency $ f$ in Hz by the relation $ \omega=2\pi f$ . Also as always in this book, the sampling rate is denoted by $ f_s=1/T$ . Since the frequency axis for digital signals goes from $ -f_s/2$ to $ f_s/2$ (non-inclusive), we have $ \omega
T\in[-\pi,\pi)$ , where $ [\;)$ denotes a half-open interval. Since the frequency $ f=\pm f_s/2$ is usually rejected in applications, it is more practical to take $ \omega T\in(-\pi,\pi)$ .
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... ``echo''.4.4
The minimum perceivable delay in audio work depends very much on how the filter is being used and also on what signals are being filtered. A few milliseconds of delay is usually not perceivable in the monaural case. Note, however, that delay perception is a function of frequency. One rule of thumb is that, to be perceived as instantaneous, a filter's delay should be kept below a few cycles at each frequency. A near-worst-case test signal for monaural filter-delay perception is an impulse (pure click). (A worst-case test would require some weighting vs. frequency.) Delay distortion is less noticeable if all frequencies in a signal are delayed by the same amount of time, since that preserves the original waveshape exactly and delays it as a whole. Otherwise transient smearing occurs, and the ear is fairly sensitive to onset synchrony across different frequency bands.
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...5.1
One might argue that nonlinear filters must be considered a special case of time-varying filters, because any variation in the filter coefficients must occur over time, and in the nonlinear case, this variation simply happens to occur in a manner that depends on the input signal sample values. However, since a constant signal (dc) does not vary over time, a nonlinear filter may also be time-invariant. As we will see in this chapter, the key test for nonlinearity is whether the filter coefficients change as a function of the input signal. A linear time-varying filter, on the other hand, must exhibit the same coefficient variation over time for all input signals.
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... space5.2
A set of vectors $ {\cal S}\in{\bf R}^N$ (or $ {\bf C}^N$ ) is said to form a vector space if $ x+y\in{\cal S}$ and $ \alpha
x\in{\cal S}$ for all $ x\in{\cal S}$ , $ y\in{\cal S}$ , and for all scalars $ \alpha\in{\bf R}$ (or $ {\bf C}$ ) [84,73].
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... purposes.5.3
For more about the mathematics of linear vector spaces, look into linear algebra [58] (which covers finite-dimensional linear vector spaces) and/or operator theory [56] (which treats the infinite-dimensional case). The mathematical treatments used in this book will be closer to complex analysis [14,43], but with some linear algebra concepts popping up from time to time, especially in the context of matlab examples. (The name ``matlab'' derives from ``matrix laboratory,'' and it was originally written by Cleve Moler to be an interactive desk-calculator front end for a library of numerical linear algebra subroutines (LINPACK and EISPACK). As a result, matlab syntax is designed to follow linear algebra notation as closely as possible.)
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... domain.6.1
The term ``difference equation'' is a discrete-time counterpart to the term ``differential equation'' in continuous time. LTI difference equations in discrete time correspond to linear differential equations with constant coefficients in continuous time. The subject of finite differences is devoted to ``discretizing'' differential equations to obtain difference equations [96,3].
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... scheme|textbf.6.2
The term ``explicit'' in this context means that the output $ y(n)$ at time $ n$ can be computed using only past output samples $ y(n-1)$ , $ y(n-2)$ , etc. When solving partial differential equations numerically on a grid in 2 or more dimensions, it is possible to derive finite difference schemes which cannot be computed recursively, and these are termed implicit finite difference schemes [96,3]. Implicit schemes can often be converted to explicit schemes by a change of coordinates (e.g., to modal coordinates [86]).
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... filter.6.3
Instead of defining the impulse response as the response of the filter to $ \delta (n)$ , a unit-amplitude impulse arriving at time zero, we could equally well choose our ``standard impulse'' to be $ A\delta(n-n_0)$ , an amplitude-$ A$ impulse arriving at time $ n_0$ . However, setting $ n_0=0$ and $ A = 1$ makes the math simpler to write, as we will see.
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...MDFT6.4
http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jos/mdft/Convolution.html
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...MDFT6.5
http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jos/mdft/
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... causal,7.1
In a causal filter5.3), each output sample is computed using only current and past input samples--no future samples. A causal signal is similarly zero before time zero ( $ x(n)=0, \forall n<0$ ). An LTI filter is causal if and only if its impulse response is a causal signal.
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... points7.2
When $ X(z)$ is a filter transfer function (i.e., $ x(n)$ is a filter impulse response), these singularities are called poles of the transfer function, as will be defined in §6.6 below. Analogously, one can speak of ``poles'' in the z transform of a signal containing exponential components of the form $ \exp(\sigma n)\cdot\cos(\omega n + \phi)$ .
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... follows:7.3
Each `$ n$ ' in these equations should be interpreted as `$ \cdot$ '.
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... terms,7.4
By the fundamental theorem of algebra, a polynomial $ A(z)$ of any degree can be completely factored as a product of first-order polynomials, where the zeros may be complex.
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...residuez7.5
Matlab Signal Processing Toolbox or Octave Forge collection--see also §J.5 (p. [*]).
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...biquads.7.6
A biquad is simply a second-order filter section--see §B.1.6 for details.
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... function|textbf.7.7
The case $ M=N$ is called a proper transfer function, and $ M>N$ is termed improper.
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... filter7.8
In physical models, such a superposition of identical resonances is often called degeneracy [86].
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... on:7.9
These closed-form sums were quickly computed using the free symbolic mathematics program called maxima running under Linux, specifically by typing factor(ev(sum(m+1,m,0,n),simpsum)); followed by
factor(ev(sum(%,n,0,m),simpsum));.
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...B2.7.10
Since convolution is commutative, either operand to a convolution can be interpreted as the filter impulse-response while the other is interpreted as the input signal. However, in the matlab filter function, the operand designated as the input signal (3rd argument) determines the length to which the output signal is truncated.
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...MDFT.8.1
Some elementary review regarding signals and spectra is given in Appendix A.
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... ripple8.2
A passband may be defined as any frequency band that the filter is trying to ``pass''--i.e., not trying to suppress. For example, in a lowpass filter with cut-off frequency $ \omega_c$ , the passband is the interval $ [-\omega_c,\omega]$ . A lowpass filter typically also has a stopband that the filter is designed to suppress. For practical realizability, there should be a transition band between a passband and stopband. In some simple filters, such as Butterworth filters introduced in §7.6.4 below, there are passbands but no stopbands; instead, the stopband is replaced by a roll-off, typically specifiable in dB/octave. (The rolloff region can be viewed as a transition band between a passband and a ``stop point'' such as some number of zeros at $ \omega=\infty$ for lowpass filters, or $ \omega=0$ for highpass filters. Within a passband or stopband, the amplitude response may exhibit ripple, that is, it may oscillate about the desired band gain, as discussed further in §7.6.4 below. A ripple specification sets a maximum deviation limit on the ripple.
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...freqzdemo2.8.3
The ``multiplot'' created by the plotfr utility (§J.4) cannot be saved to disk in Octave, although it looks fine on screen. In Matlab, there is no problem saving multiplots to disk.
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....8.4
The quantity $ \overline{A}(1/z)$ is known as the para-Hermitian conjugate of the polynomial $ A(z)$ . It coincides with the ordinary complex conjugate along the unit circle, while elsewhere in the $ z$ -plane, $ z$ is replaced by $ 1/z$ and only the coefficients of $ A$ are conjugated. A mathematical feature of the para-Hermitian conjugate is that $ \overline{A}(1/z)$ is an analytic function of $ z$ while $ \overline{A(z)}$ is not.
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....9.1
See §6.2 and §8.7 for related discussion.
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... grow.9.2
As discussed in §6.8.5, the impulse response of a repeated pole of multiplicity $ k$ at a point on the unit circle may grow with amplitude envelope proportional to $ n^{k-1}$ .
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...PASP.9.3
See, e.g., http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jos/pasp/Passive_Reflectances.html .
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... time-constant|textbf9.4
Decay time constants were introduced in Book I [84] of this series (``Exponentials''). The time constant $ \tau$ is formally defined for exponential decays as the time it takes to decay by the factor $ 1/e$ . In audio signal processing, exponential decay times are normally defined instead as $ t_{60}$ or $ t_{40}$ , etc., where $ t_{60}$ , e.g., is the time to decay by 60 dB. A quick calculation reveals that $ t_{60}$ is a little less than seven time constants ( $ t_{60}\approx 6.91\tau$ ).
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...MDFT10.1
http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jos/mdft/Two_s_Complement_Fixed_Point_Format.html
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...GrayAndMarkel75,MG,PASP.10.2
http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jos/pasp/Conventional_Ladder_Filters.html
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...:10.3
The notation `` $ \left(\mbox{mod}\;8\right)$ '' is an abbreviation for ``modulo $ 8$ '' commonly used in the branch of mathematics known as number theory.. Two integers $ m$ and $ n$ are said to be equal modulo $ M$ if there exists an integer $ k$ such that $ m=n+kM$ . Thus, $ 6$ is equal to $ -2$ modulo $ 8$ because $ 6\,=\,-2+8$ . These integers are also equal $ \left(\mbox{mod}\;8\right)$ to $ 14$ , $ -10$ , $ 22$ , $ -18$ , and so on.
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... plane.10.4
To plot the poles and zeros for the example of §7.5.2, one can say (in matlab) plot(roots(B),'o',roots(A),'x') -- or say help zplane.
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... tf2sos|textbf10.5
In Matlab, the Signal Processing Toolbox is required for second-order section support. In Octave, the free Octave-Forge add-on collection is required.
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... Octave.10.6
The Matlab Signal Processing Toolbox has even more sos functions--say ``lookfor sos'' in Matlab to find them all.
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... bandwidths10.7
See §E.6 for a definition of half-power bandwidth.
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... series.10.8
In this particular case, there is an even better structure known as a ladder filter that can be interpreted as a physical model of the vocal tract [48,86].
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...pfe).10.9
In practice, it is not critical to get the biquad numerators exactly right. In fact, the vowel still sounds ok if all the biquad numerators are set to 1, in which case, nulls are introduced between the formant resonances in the spectrum. The ear is not nearly as sensitive to spectral nulls as it is to spectral peaks. Furthermore, natural listening environments introduce nulls quite often, such as when a direct signal is mixed with its own reflection from a flat surface (such as a wall or floor).
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...even.11.1
In the complex case, the zero-phase impulse response is Hermitian, i.e.,
$ h(n) = \overline{h(-n)}$ .
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... algorithm.11.2
The remez function is implemented in the Matlab Signal Processing Toolbox and in the Octave Forge collection.
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....12.1
Another way to show that all minimum-phase filters and their inverses are causal, using the Cauchy integral theorem from complex variables [14], is to consider a Laurent series expansion of the transfer function $ H(z)$ about any point on the unit circle. Because all poles are inside the unit circle (for either $ H(z)$ or $ 1/H(z)$ ), the expansion is one-sided (no positive powers of $ z$ ). A Laurent expansion about a point on the unit circle interprets unstable poles as noncausal exponentials in the time domain, which ``decay'' in the direction of negative time, as discussed and illustrated in §8.7.
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...).12.2
The allpass $ S_1(z)$ as defined has magnitude $ \vert\xi\vert>1$ over the unit circle instead of $ 1$ as is usually defined for allpass gains. To normalize the allpass gain to $ 1$ , we can define $ H_2(z)=(\xi-z^{-1})H_1(z)$ instead.
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... phase,12.3
The convolution of two minimum phase sequences is minimum phase, since this just doubles each pole and zero in place, so they remain inside the unit circle.
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... method12.4
We can loosely define nonparametric signal processing as performing array operations on signals and spectra, as opposed to working with parametric representations such as poles and zeros. Generally speaking, nonparametric signal processing is typically more robust than parametric signal processing [87].
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...tmps.12.5
A Mathematica notebook for this purpose was written by Andrew Simper:
http://www.vellocet.com/dsp/MinimumPhase/MinimumPhase.html
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...MDFT.A.1
http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jos/mdft/Sinusoids_Exponentials.html
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...MDFT.A.2
http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jos/mdft/Discrete_Fourier_Transform_DFT.html
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... overflow.B.1
A small chance of overflow remains because sinusoids at different frequencies can be delayed differently by the filter, causing an increased peak amplitude in the output due to phase realignment.
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...resonanceB.2
A resonance may be defined as a local peak in the amplitude response of a filter, caused by a pole close to the unit circle.
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... case,B.3
In the case of complex coefficients $ a_i$ , $ B(z) =
\overline{a_2} + \overline{a_1}z^{-1}+ z^{-2}$ .
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... applications.B.4
For the reader with some background in analog circuit design, the dc blocker is the digital equivalent of the analog blocking capacitor.
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...ZolzerB.5
The form of Equations (B.11) and (B.12) work well for first-order shelf filters. For higher (odd) orders, it is better to use a Butterworth band-split, as has been used in Faust's filter.lib since June 2012 (see Appendix K). (This footnote added in the 4th printing.)
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... response,B.6
See §8.2 in Chapter 8.
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... virtualB.7
The term virtual analog synthesis refers to digital implementations of classic analog synthesizers.
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...causal|textbfC.1
Recall that a filter is said to be causal if its impulse response $ h(n)$ is zero for $ n < 0$ .
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... have,C.2
Note that the time-domain norm $ \left\Vert\,y\,\right\Vert _2$ is unnormalized (which it must be) while the frequency-domain norm $ \left\Vert\,Y\,\right\Vert _2$ is normalized by $ 1/\sqrt{2\pi}$ . This is the cleanest choice of $ L2$ norm definitions for present purposes.
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... FiltersC.3
The remainder of this appendix is relatively advanced and can be omitted without loss of continuity in what follows.
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... FiltersC.4
The remainder of this appendix is relatively advanced and can be omitted without loss of continuity in what follows.
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...causalD.1
A signal $ x(t)$ is said to be causal if it is zero for all $ t<0$ . A system is said to be causal if its response to an input never occurs before the input is received; thus, an LTI filter is a causal system whenever its impulse response $ h(t)$ is a causal signal.
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... order,D.2
The order of a pole is its multiplicity. For example, the function $ H(s) = \frac{1}{(s-p)^3}$ has a pole at $ s=p$ of order 3.
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... there''.D.3
Note that, mathematically, our solution specifies that the mass position is zero prior to time 0. Since we are using the unilateral Laplace transform, there is really ``no such thing'' as time less than zero, so this is consistent. Using the bilateral Laplace transform, the same solution is obtained if the mass is at position $ x=0$ for all negative time $ t<0$ , and the driving force $ f(t)$ imparts a doublet having ``amplitude'' $ x_0m$ at time 0 , i.e., $ f(t)=x_0 m {\dot\delta}(t)\leftrightarrow
F(s)=x_0 ms$ , and all initial conditions are taken to be zero (as they must be for the bilateral Laplace transform). A doublet is defined as the time-derivative of the impulse signal (defined in Eq.$ \,$ (E.5)). In other words, impulsive inputs at time 0 can be used to set up arbitrary initial conditions. Specifically, the input $ f(t) = x_0 m {\dot\delta}(t) +
v_0 m \delta(t)$ slams the system into initial state $ (x_0,v_0)$ at time 0.
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... respectively.E.1
Exercise: Determine $ A$ and $ \phi$ and check your result by performing the Laplace transform and comparing to Eq.$ \,$ (E.8).
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... filters.F.1
A short tutorial on matrices appears in [84], available online at
http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jos/mdft/Matrices.html.
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...MDFT.F.2
http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jos/mdft/Matrix_Formulation_DFT.html.
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...MDFTF.3
http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jos/mdft/
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... properties.F.4
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circulant_matrix
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... follows:F.5
While this example is easily done by hand, the matlab function tf2ss can be used more generally (``transfer function to state space'' conversion).
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... way.F.6
The methods discussed in this section are intended for LTI system identification. Many valued guitar-amplifier modes, of course, provide highly nonlinear distortion. Identification of nonlinear systems is a relatively advanced topic with lots of special techniques [24,17,97,4,86].
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... derive.F.7
There are many possible definitions of pseudoinverse for a matrix $ \mathbf{x}$ . The Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse is perhaps most natural because it gives the least-squares solution to the set of simultaneous linear equations $ \underline{y}=\mathbf{x}\underline{h}$ , as we show later in this section.
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...Golub.F.8
Say help slash in Matlab.
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... matrix,G.1
A short tutorial on matrices appears in [84], available online at
http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jos/mdft/Matrices.html.
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... elsewhere.G.2
I.e., $ \underline{\delta}(n)=\delta(n)I_{q\times q}$ , where $ I_{q\times
q}$ is the $ q\times q$ identity matrix, and $ \delta (n)$ denotes the discrete-time impulse signal (which is 1 at time $ n = 0$ and zero for all $ n\ne 0$ ).
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... matrix.G.3
To emphasize something is a matrix, it is often typeset in a boldface font. In this appendix, however, capital letters are more often used to denote matrices.
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... series,G.4
Let $ S(R) \isdef \sum_{n=0}^{\infty} R^n$ , where $ R$ is a square matrix. Then $ S(R) - R\,S(R) = I \Rightarrow S(R) = (I-R)^{-1}$ .
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....G.5
Equivalently, a causal transfer function $ H(z)=B(z)/A(z)$ contains a delay-free path whenever $ H(\infty) \neq 0$ , since $ H(\infty) = b_0 = h(0)$ .
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... model.G.6
An exception arises when the model may be time varying. A time varying $ C$ matrix, for example, will cause time-varying zeros in the system. These zeros may momentarily cancel poles, rendering them unobservable for a short time.
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... quasi-harmonicG.7
The overtones of a vibrating string are never exactly harmonic because all strings have some finite stiffness. This is why we call them ``overtones'' instead of ``harmonics.'' A perfectly flexible ideal string may have exactly harmonic overtones [55].
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... form.G.8
As of this writing, this function does not exist in Octave or Octave Forge, but it is easily simulated using sos2tf followed by tf2ss.
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... matlab.G.9
Specifically, this example was computed using Octave's tf2ss. Matlab gives a different but equivalent form in which the state variables are ordered in reverse. The effect is a permutation given by flipud(fliplr(M)), where M denotes the matrix A, B, or C. In other words, the two state-space models are obtained from each other using the similarity transformation matrix T=[0 0 1; 0 1 0; 1 0 0] (a simple permutation matrix).
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... numerically.G.10
If the Matlab Control Toolbox is available, there are higher level routines for manipulating state-space representations; type ``lookfor state-space'' in Matlab to obtain a summary, or do a search on the Mathworks website. Octave tends to provide its control-related routines in the base distribution of Octave.
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....G.11
In general, we can write an order $ k$ Jordan block $ J_i$ corresponding to eigenvalue $ p$ as

$\displaystyle J = p I + \Delta
$

where $ I$ denotes the $ k\times k$ identity matrix, and

$\displaystyle \Delta \isdef
\left[\begin{array}{ccccc}
0 & 1 & 0 & \cdots & 0 \\ [2pt]
0 & 0 & 1 & \cdots & 0 \\
\vdots & \vdots & \ddots & \ddots & \vdots \\
0 & 0 & 0 & \ddots & 1 \\ [2pt]
0 & 0 & 0 & \cdots & 0 \\
\end{array}\right].
$

Note that $ \Delta^n$ , for $ n=0,1,2,\ldots,k-1$ has ones along the $ n$ th superdiagonal and zeros elsewhere. Also, $ \Delta^n = 0$ for $ n\ge k$ . By the binomial theorem,

\begin{eqnarray*}
J^n \;=\; (pI+\Delta)^n &\!=\!& p^nI + np^{n-1}\Delta
+ \frac{n(n-1)}{2}p^{n-2}\Delta^2
+ \frac{n(n-1)(n-1)}{3!}p^{n-3}\Delta^3 + \cdots \\
& & + \left(\begin{array}{c} n \\ [2pt] k \end{array}\right)p^k\Delta^{n-k}
+ \cdots + np\Delta^{n-1} + \Delta^n,
\end{eqnarray*}

where $ \left(\begin{array}{c} n \\ [2pt] k \end{array}\right)\isdef n!/[k!(n-k)!]$ denotes the binomial coefficient (also called ``$ n$ choose $ k$ '' in probability theory). Thus,

$\displaystyle J^n =
\left[\begin{array}{cccccccc}
p^n & np^{n-1} & \frac{n(n-1)}{2} p^{n-2} & \cdots & \cdots & 0 \\ [2pt]
0 & p^n & np^{n-1} & \frac{n(n-1)}{2} p^{n-2} & \cdots & 0 \\
\vdots & & \ddots & \ddots & \ddots & \\
0 & 0 & 0 & & & np^{n-1}\\ [2pt]
0 & 0 & 0 & & & p^n \\ [2pt]
\end{array}\right],
$

where the zeros in the upper-right corner are valid for sufficiently large $ n$ , and otherwise the indicated series is simply truncated.
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... matrix.H.1
Recursive filters are brought into this framework in the time-invariant case by dealing directly with their impulse response, or the so called moving average representation. Linear time-varying recursive filters have a matrix representation, but it is not easy to find. In general one must symbolically implement the equation $ y_n = \sum_{i=-\infty}^\infty h_{ni}x_i +
\sum_{j=1}^\infty \beta_{nj}y_{n-j}$ and collect coefficients of $ x_i$ .
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... dc).I.1
In other words, matching leading terms in the Taylor series expansion of $ G_a^2$ about $ \omega_a=0$ determines the poles as a function of the zeros, leaving the zeros unconstrained. It is shown in [64] that any filter of the form

$\displaystyle G_a^2(\omega_a) = \frac{B(\omega_a)}{B(\omega_a) + b_{2N} \omega_a^{2N}}
$

is maximally flat at dc, where $ B(\omega_a)\isdef b_0 + b_2\omega_a^2
+ b_4\omega_a^4 + \dots + b_{2M}\omega_a^{2M}$ , with $ M<N$ necessary to force a zero at $ \omega_a=\infty$ . Choosing maximum flatness also at $ \omega_a=\infty$ pushes all the zeros out to infinity, giving the simple form in Eq.$ \,$ (I.1). It is noted in [64] how the more general class of Butterworth lowpass filters can be used to provide maximum flatness at dc while obtaining more general spectral shapes, such as notches at specific finite frequencies.
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... causalI.2
$ H(e^{j\omega})$ is said to be causal if $ h(n) \isdef \int_{-\pi}^\pi H(e^{j\omega}) e^{j\omega n}d \omega/2\pi = 0$ for $ n < 0$ .
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... Octave.J.1
On a Red Hat Fedora Core Linux system, octave-forge is presently in ``Fedora Extras'', so that one can simply type yum install octave-forge at a shell prompt (as root).
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... complex):J.2
Thanks to Matt Wright for contributing the original version of this example.
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... language|textbfK.1
The Faust home page is http://faust.grame.fr/. Faust is included in the Planet CCRMA distribution (http://ccrma.stanford.edu/planetccrma/software/). The examples in this appendix have been tested with Faust version 0.9.9.2a2.
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... environments.K.2
Faust ``architecture files'' and plugin-generators are currently available for Max/MSP, PD [65,31], VST, LADSPA, ALSA-GTK, JACK-GTK, and SuperCollider, as of this writing.
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...K.3
A ``with'' block is not required, but it minimizes ``global name pollution.'' In other words, a definition and its associated with block are more analogous to a C function definition in which local variables may be used. Faust statements can be in any order, so multiple definitions of the same symbol are not allowed. A with block can thus be used also to override global definitions in a local context.
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... background.K.4
Facility with basic C++ programming is also assumed for this appendix.
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... signals,K.5
A causal signal is any signal that is zero before time 0 (see §5.3).
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...cpgr.dsp.K.6
The faust2firefox script (distributed with Faust version 0.9.9.3 and later) can be used to generate SVG block diagrams and open them in the Firefox web browser.
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... response:K.7
This specific output was obtained by editing cpgrir-print.cpp to replace %8f by %g in the print statements, in order to print more significant digits.
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...K.8
In many cases the signal processing in Faust can occur within a ``foreign function'' written in C or C++ and used as a ``black box'' within Faust, like the cos() function in Fig.K.5. However, this approach is presently limited because foreign functions can have only float and int argument types, and they can only return a float each sample. It is possible to set up persistent state in a foreign function by means of static variables, but this does not generalize easily to multiple instances. Therefore, more general extensions may require direct modification of the generated C++, which usually obsoletes the Faust source code.
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... patch,K.9
All manually generated .dsp files and pd patches in this appendix are available at http://ccrma.stanford.edu/realsimple/faust/faustpd.tar.gz.
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...cpgrui~-help.pd,K.10
In pd, a dynamically loadable module (pd plugin) is called an abstraction. (This is distinct from the one-off subpatch which is encapsulated code within the parent patch, and which resides in the same file as the parent patch [66].) It is customary to document each abstraction with its own ``help patch''. The convention is to name the help patch ``name-help.pd'', where ``name'' is the name of the abstraction. Right-clicking on an object in pd and selecting ``Help'' loads the help patch in a new pd window.
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...loadbangK.11
The loadbang object sends a ``bang'' message when the patch finishes loading.
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...synth.pd.K.12
On a Linux system with Planet CCRMA installed, the command ``locate synth.pd'' should find it, e.g., at /usr/share/doc/faust-pd-0.9.8.6/examples/synth/synth.pd .
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... addingK.13
After running jack-rack, the LADSPA plugin was added by clicking on the menu items ``Add / Uncategorised / C / Constant_Peak_Gain_Resonator''. If jack-rack does not find this or other plugins, make sure your LADSPA_PATH environment variable is set. A typical setting would be /usr/local/lib/ladspa/:/usr/lib/ladspa/.
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...jack-rack-connect.K.14
Sound routings such as this may be accomplished using the ``Connect'' window in qjackctl. In that window, there is an Audio tab and a MIDI tab, and the Audio tab is selected by default. Just click twice to select the desired source and destination and then click ``Connect''. Such connections can be made automatic by clicking ``Patchbay'' in the qjackctl control panel, specifying your connections, saving, then clicking ``Activate''. Connections can also be established at the command line using aconnect from the alsa-utils package (included with Planet CCRMA).
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...Receptor|textbf.K.15
The Receptor is a hardware VST plugin host designed for studio work and live musical performance. While it only supports Windows VST plugins, it is based on a Red Hat Linux operating system using wine for Windows compatibility. The VST plugin described in this section was tested on system version 1.6.20070717 running on Receptor hardware version 1.0. This system expects VST-2.3 plugins, and so VST-2.4 plugins cause a warning message to be printed in the Receptor's system log. However, v2.4 plugins seem to work fine in the 2.3 framework. There was a competitor to the Receptor called Plugzilla that supported both VST and LADSPA plugins, but Plugzilla no longer appears to be available.
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... input.K.16
Pd must have at least one MIDI-input port defined at startup for this to work. For example, a typical ~/.pdrc file might contain the following startup options for pd:
-jack -r 48000 -alsamidi -midiindev 1 -midioutdev 1 -audiooutdev 1 -outchannels 2 -path /usr/lib/pd/...
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