Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics

Summer Workshops 2015 Announced!

2015 Summer Workshop lineup announced! Check https://ccrma.stanford.edu/workshops for details. Register http://app.certain.com/profile/form/index.cfm?PKformID=0x1979858dec1.

Upcoming Events

From simulation to auralization to virtual auditory displays

Date: 
Fri, 07/24/2015 - 11:00am - 12:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA Seminar Room
Event Type: 
Hearing Seminar

From simulation to auralization to virtual auditory displays
Michael Vorländer

 

FREE
Open to the Public
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Recent Events

Computational modeling of early language acquisition – Bridging the gap between acoustic input and high-level linguistic representations

Date: 
Fri, 06/19/2015 - 11:00am - 12:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA Seminar Room
Event Type: 
Hearing Seminar
It is amazing that all of us as infants learn how to parse the auditory environment around us. Okko Räsänen is here at Stanford as a PostDoc, and coming to CCRMA to talk about his work on understanding how infants learn to segment words out of the acoustic stream. This is a special post-quarter seminar, and I think the topic is important to anybody that thinks about high-level understanding of sound.

Who: Okko Räsänen (Stanford and Aalto University)
What: Computational modeling of early language acquisition
          Bridging the gap between acoustic input and high-level linguistic representations
When: 11AM on Friday June 19, 2015
Where: CCRMA Seminar Room
FREE
Open to the Public

Transmissions from Real to Imaginary Places

Date: 
Fri, 06/12/2015 - 7:00pm - 9:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Stage
Event Type: 
Concert

Friday, June 12th
Installation open from 7-9pm
CCRMA Stage

Cathleen Grado presents:
"Transmissions from Real to Imaginary Places"

The installation addresses the impermanence of memory and the ways space and location affect cumulative sensory experiences. The third iteration in an ongoing series, the work is composed of soundmarks from multiple geographic locations over the duration of several years.

Refreshments will be served. 

cathleengrado.net
 

Free
Open to the Public

Transmissions from Real to Imaginary Places

Date: 
Mon, 06/08/2015 - 3:55pm
Location: 
CCRMA Stage
Event Type: 
Concert
An installation that addresses the impermanence of memory and the manner in which space and location affect one’s cumulitive sensory experiences. It is the third of an ongoing series of works, and is composed of numerous recordings of specific places and aural events made over periods of time.
Free
Open to the Public

Henry Kaiser + William Winant + Tania Chen

Date: 
Thu, 06/04/2015 - 7:30pm - 9:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA STAGE
Event Type: 
Concert

FREE
Open to the Public
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Recent News

Sonifying the world: How life's data becomes music

When Chris Chafe translates data into music, listeners sway to the beat of seizing brains, economic swings and smog.

"Unlike sex or hunger, music doesn’t seem absolutely necessary to everyday survival – yet our musical self was forged deep in human history, in the crucible of evolution by the adaptive pressure of the natural world. That’s an insight that has inspired Chris Chafe, Director of Stanford University’s Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (or CCRMA, stylishly pronounced karma).

Twist the Gears of a Massive VR Music Engine with Carillon



Really nice article about a new VR instrument created by Rob Hamilton and Chris Platz. Enjoy!

Behind the Scenes at the Stanford Laptop Orchestra

Really nice article about our very own SLOrk!



THX and Dr. James A. Moorer in the NYTimes

Dr. James A. Moorer updates the THX sound from 30-70 voices, to futher adapt to the advancing spatialization capabilites of theaters.
Read the full article here!
http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/04/17/as-thx-gets-a-new-trailer-an-interview-with-its-composer/?hpw&rref=movies&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&module=well-region&region=bottom-well&WT.nav=bottom-well

How a University Launched the Electronic Music Revolution

Article about CCRMA and Andrew Nelson's book featured recently on MetroNews:

Stanford and the Computer Music Revolution

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