Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics

Summer Workshops 2015 Announced!

2015 Summer Workshop lineup announced! Check https://ccrma.stanford.edu/workshops for details. Register http://app.certain.com/profile/form/index.cfm?PKformID=0x1979858dec1.

Upcoming Events

Michael Mandel on Auditory bubbles: Estimating time frequency importance functions

Date: 
Fri, 03/20/2015 - 11:00am - 12:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA Seminar Room
Event Type: 
Hearing Seminar
Listeners can reliably identify speech in noisy conditions, but it is not well understood which specific features of the speech they use to do this.  This talk presents a data-driven framework for identifying these features.  By analyzing listening-test results involving the same speech utterance mixed with many different "bubble" noise instances, the framework is able to compute the importance of each time-frequency point in the utterance to its intelligibility, which we call the time-frequency importance function.  These results can be seen as a quantification of a listener's strategy for understanding a 
FREE
Open to the Public

Xavier Serra - Music Information Retrieval from a Multicultural Perspective

Date: 
Mon, 04/06/2015 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom
Event Type: 
Guest Colloquium
Music is a universal phenomenon that manifests itself in every cultural context with a particular personality and the technologies supporting music have to take into account the specificities that every musical culture might have. This is particularly evident in the field of Music Information Retrieval, in which we aim at developing technologies to analyse, describe and explore any type of music. From this perspective we started the project CompMusic (http://compmusic.upf.edu) in which we focus on a number of MIR problems through the study of five music cultures: Hindustani (North India), Carnatic (South India), Turkish-makam (Turkey), Arab-Andalusian (Maghreb), and Beijing Opera (China).
FREE
Open to the Public
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Recent Events

Cristina Valdés - 20th and 21st Century Piano Music

Date: 
Wed, 02/18/2015 - 7:30pm - 9:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Stage
Event Type: 
Concert

Pianist Cristina Valdés will perform a program of 20th and 21st Century Piano Music. The program will include music by Robert Platz, Helmut Lachenmann, Giacinto Scelsi, and Jonathan Harvey.

 

FREE
Open to the Public

Raitis Smits - Emerging Techno-Ecological Art Practices - the Poetics of Green Energy

Date: 
Wed, 02/18/2015 - 5:15pm - 6:45pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom
Event Type: 
Guest Colloquium
Today we are witnessing the transformation process from new media to post media situation which is characterized not only by equality and convergence of different media technologies but also by emergence of new "techno-ecological" paradigm. Artists, like those from the Renewable Network who once were in vanguard exploring digital frontiers, today are among those who are engaged in the quest for a more sustainable future. By working together with scientists and farmers, urban gardeners and rural communities, media archeologists and future visionaries, the artists are bringing to foreground ecological issues, yet staying rooted in new media.
FREE
Open to the Public

Moving Auditory EEGs out of the Lab

Date: 
Fri, 02/13/2015 - 11:00am - 12:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA Seminar Room
Event Type: 
Hearing Seminar

It's now time to take EEG out of the lab and into the real world. Our speaker on February 13 will talk about his efforts to build a mobile EEG recording device and validate its performance with an auditory task.  Maarten De Vos received his PhD from KU Leuven (Belgium) and is visiting Stanford for a few months, before heading to a faculty position at Oxford.

His validation experiments are interesting because he describes them as a means of decoding attention.  He's using P300 attention-modulated correlates to measure what people are attending to.  Very interesting.

  Who: Maarten De Vos (University of Oldenberg, Oxford and visiting Stanford)

FREE
Open to the Public

Internal Research Colloquium: Jimmy Tobin, Iran Roman, John Chowning

Date: 
Wed, 02/11/2015 - 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom (Room 217)
Event Type: 
Internal Colloquium
Please join us for conference-style presentations from Jimmy Tobin and Iran Roman about their work in the Neuromusic lab, and a presentation from John Chowning (abstract below).

Jimmy Tobin - "Short-term neuroplastic changes associated with learning of novel auditory-motor skills and subsequent sleep measured by electroencephalography (EEG)

Iran Roman - "Identifying ERPs Associated with the Syntactical Meaning of Timbre and Density in Music"

John Chowning - "Video of Johan Sundberg’s demonstration of vocal resonances"
FREE
Open to the Public
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Recent News

The creativity of 'karma'

Palo Alto Weekly writer Nick Veronin takes a look at recent work being done at CCRMA and profiles the upcoming "Designing Musical Games::Gaming Musical Design", "New Music Controllers" and "3D Printing for Acoustics" Summer Workshops.


Read more here...

Review: Auditory Hallucinations, Composed

Congratulations to Jonathan Berger for more great reviews of his "Visitations!"

How Music Hijacks Our Perception of Time

Very interesting article by Dr. Jonathan Berger! "One evening, some 40 years ago, I got lost in time. I was at a performance of Schubert’s String Quintet in C major. During the second movement I had the unnerving feeling that time was literally grinding to a halt. The sensation was powerful, visceral, overwhelming. It was a life-changing moment, or, as it felt at the time, a life-changing eon.
 
It has been my goal ever since to compose music that usurps the perceived flow of time and commandeers the sense of how time passes. Although I’ve learned to manipulate subjective time, I still stand in awe of Schubert’s unparalleled power.

Holly Herndon's New Single Named Best New Track on Pitchfork

Congratulations to our own Holly Herndon, once again in the news!

"In reviewing electronic music composer Holly Herndon’s breakout debut, 2012's Movement, we noted her penchant for "Bending one person's voice into phantasmagorias", which continues on her newest, breath-halting single, “Chorus”." Read more, and watch video here...

Turning brain waves into music helps spot seizures

The music is eerie, if not altogether aesthetically pleasing. Like a soundtrack moments before a film's horrifying twist, the sounds of the brain in a state of seizure betrays the plot with little more than a skin-prickling crescendo.
 
This music, the electrical activity of the seizing brain translated to sound, is a merger of art and medicine, the work of Stanford's Dr. Josef Parvizi, an epilepsy specialist, and Chris Chafe, a composer and music researcher. 
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