Colloquium Series

The CCRMA Colloquium is a weekly gathering of CCRMA students, faculty, staff, and guests. It is an opportunity for members of the CCRMA community and invited speakers to share the work that they are doing in the field of Computer Music.  The colloquium typically happens every Wednesday during the school year from 5:15 - 7:00pm and meets in the CCRMA Classroom, Knoll 217 unless otherwise noted. 

Colloquia and concerts are announced via a mailing list.



 

Recent Colloquia

  • Dana Massie - Sample rate conversion with MaxSRC

    Date: 
    Wed, 04/16/2014 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA, 2nd floor, Rm 217
    Event Type: 
    Colloquium
     

    A digital method for sample rate conversion using recursive IIR “phasor” filters, denoted MaxSRC, named in honor of Max Mathews whose work popularized the term “phasor filter". High quality sample rate conversion is useful for many applications in computer audio and music, including sound synthesis and sampled waveform playback. The most common methods used historically for sample rate conversion use FIR filters. MaxSRC uses time-varying IIR filters. 

    Open to the Public
  • José Echeveste: Antescofo, a dynamic language for real-time musician-computer interaction

    Date: 
    Mon, 04/14/2014 - 5:15pm - 6:45pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA Classroom, The Knoll 2nd floor, Rm 217
    Event Type: 
    Colloquium
     
    This talk focuses on programing of time and interaction in Antescofo, a real-time system for performance coordination between musicians and computer processes during live music performance. To this end, Antescofo relies on artificial machine listening and a domain specific real-time programing language. It extends each paradigm through strong coupling of the two and strong emphasis on temporal semantics and behavior of the system.

    The challenge in bringing human actions in the loop of computing is strongly related to temporal semantics of the language, and timeliness of live execution despite heterogeneous nature of time in the two mediums.

    FREE
    Open to the Public
  • Ryan Carter : Programming Interactive Musical Systems with RTcmix

    Date: 
    Wed, 04/09/2014 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA Classroom, The Knoll 2nd floor, Rm 217
    Event Type: 
    Colloquium
    Recent work in RTcmix (an open-source digital signal processing and sound synthesis language implemented in C/C++) facilitates flexible and interactive audio integration for a variety of applications. Composer and programmer Ryan Carter will present two recent projects: iMonkeypants (an iOS app album of algorithmically generated, interactive compositions) and Headless Monkey Attack (an alternately solo or collaborative performance project for video game controller and improvising musicians).
     


    Open to the Public
  • Georg Hajdu : Audio-based Composition

    Date: 
    Wed, 04/02/2014 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
    Location: 
    Rm217, CCRMA Classroom (2nd floor)
    Event Type: 
    Colloquium
     

    Audio-based composition is a notion that encompasses novel approaches in the field of composition where recorded sounds serve as the basis for a symbolic composition process—spectral composition being an example of such an approach. Over the past 20 years, I have devised a number of strategies and software environments which enable me to transform audio material into compositions such as in my opera Der Sprung and my pieces Schwer...unheimlich schwer, Swan Song, and noiwont.

    Open to the Public
  • Anssi Klapuri - Gamified musical instrument learning: music processing techniques and learning curve optimization

    Date: 
    Wed, 03/19/2014 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
    Location: 
    Rm 217, CCRMA classroom, 660 Lomita Drive, Stanford
    Event Type: 
    Colloquium
     Playing a musical instrument and playing video games share certain similarities as activities. That has enabled successful music-oriented games such as Rock Band or Guitar Hero, but even more importantly, gamified e-learning applications seem to have particularly high potential for learning certain aspects of musical instrument skills. This talk shares experiences from developing the game GuitarBots, where any real guitar is used as a game controller and the microphone signal is analyzed to figure out the user’s actions.
    Open to the Public
  • Marcus Schmickler: Politics of Frequency - Colloqium and Concert

    Date: 
    Thu, 03/06/2014 - 5:15pm - 9:00pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA Stage
    Event Type: 
    Colloquium

    5:15pm: Schmickler’s talk will give an introduction to the piece "Poiltiken der Frequenz" (Politics of Frequency). Following an hypothesis "Music and Economics share a fundamental object: numbers."  Schmickler’s project "Poiltiken der Frequenz" circles around the acoustic rendering of number concepts. Inspired by Alain Badiou’s Le Nombre et les Nombres, the piece attempts to question the apparent immediacy of numbers that allow calculation to govern today’s economy, social sciences and everyday life.

    FREE
    Open to the Public
  • John La Grou -Studio of the Future: 2020–2050

    Date: 
    Wed, 02/26/2014 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA Classroom, The Knoll 2nd floor, Rm 217
    Event Type: 
    Colloquium
     A brief look at the evolution of audio electronics, a theory of  innovation, and a sweeping vision for the next forty years of audio  production technology.
    Open to the Public
  • Marc Weidenbaum: Cultural Afterlife Is a Form of Change: Two Decades of Aphex Twin's Selected Ambient Works Volume II

    Date: 
    Wed, 02/19/2014 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
    Location: 
    Knoll Classroom
    Event Type: 
    Colloquium
    The Talk: Marc Weidenbaum will discuss his new book in the 33 1/3 series published by Bloomsbury, Selected Ambient Works Volume II, which is about the Aphex Twin (aka Richard D. James) album by that name. He will focus on the "cultural afterlife" that the album has experienced in the two decades since its initial release on the Warp and Sire labels in 1994. Faithful to Brian Eno’s definition of ambient music, Selected Ambient Works Volume II was intentionally functional: it furnished chill-out rooms, the sanctuaries amid intense raves.
    FREE
    Open to the Public
  • Jack Conte: Unbreaking Content Monetization: Why Ad Revenue Sucks at Making Creators Money

    Date: 
    Wed, 02/12/2014 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA Classroom
    Event Type: 
    Colloquium

    YouTubers are getting rich from ad revenue, right? Jack Conte's video catalog gets a million hits per month, and that generates less than $50 of ad revenue to help him pay the bills.  As an independent musician (and the balder, less attractive half of indie duo Pomplamoose), Jack will be telling us about his robotic music video projects, the currently broken content monetization systems, and the emergence of the Creative Middle Class.  If you don't like art (or puppies, or candy... just saying....) then come to learn about Jack's recent startup, Patreon, and its mission to make small business creativity a sustainable endeavor.

    FREE
    Open to the Public
  • Camille Utterback

    Date: 
    Wed, 02/05/2014 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
    Location: 
    The Knoll Classroom
    Event Type: 
    Colloquium
    From Falling Text to Custom Glass - Adventures in Interactive Art

    http://camilleutterback.com
    FREE
    Open to the Public

Upcoming Colloquia

  • François Germain: Towards practical source-independent algorithms using nonnegative matrix factorization

    Date: 
    Wed, 04/23/2014 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA Classroom, The Knoll 2nd floor, Rm 217
    Event Type: 
    Colloquium
    Limitations of nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) were recently circumvented through the development of "universal source models" which exploit the similarities inside a given class of sources in order to eliminate the need for user-provided training data. The resulting system is unsupervised from the user perspective which strongly improves its range of practical use. This method was applied to applications such as offline speech enhancement, voice activity detection and singing voice separation. 

    Full abstract:
    Open to the Public