MUS423 Research Seminars

The CCRMA Music 423 Research Seminar brings graduate students and supervising faculty together for planning and discussion of original research. Students and faculty meet either in small groups or individually, as appropriate for the research topics and interests of the participants. Research carried out is typically presented at the weekly CCRMA Colloquium (if it is of general interest to the CCRMA community) or at a Special DSP Seminar scheduled for that purpose.  In either case, announcements appear on the CCRMA Home Page as Upcoming Events.

Recent DSP Seminars

  • Acoustic Source Localization in Wireless Sensor Networks: Model and Numerical Algorithm

    Date: 
    Thu, 04/30/2015 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA Classroom [Knoll 217]
    Event Type: 
    DSP Seminar

    Acoustic Source Localization in Wireless Sensor Networks: Model and Numerical Algorithm

    Abstract: Jianhua Yuan will present a series of techniques, based upon the energy based acoustic features, to locate a sound source given measurements of the sound field. For wireless ad hoc sensor network applications, energy based acoustic features is an appropriate choice since the acoustic power emitted by targets, such as moving vehicles usually varies slowly with respect to time. In this approach, mathematical models and new numerical methods may be used to yield higher accuracy in terms of source location estimates compared to the earlier method.
     

    FREE
    Open to the Public
  • Recent progress in efficient physics-based synthesis of string instrument sound

    Date: 
    Thu, 04/23/2015 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA Classroom [Knoll 217]
    Event Type: 
    DSP Seminar

    ABSTRACT

    Applications combining digital waveguides, modal synthesis, and finite-difference time-domain modeling will be presented in the context of efficient simulation of string instruments.

    The first part of this talk will introduce a technique for modeling bridge admittances and body radiativity profiles from frequency response measurements on guitars and bowed string instruments. The formulation, relying on modal analysis, is then used to construct reflectance and radiativity models enabling efficient simulation of string plucks via digital waveguides.
    FREE
    Open to the Public
  • An interactive interface for predominant pitch extraction, and its applications in singing evaluation, source separation and cover-version generation.

    Date: 
    Tue, 01/27/2015 - 5:30pm - 6:30pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA Seminar Room [Knoll 315]
    Event Type: 
    DSP Seminar

    Dr. Vishweshwara Rao, 
    SensiBol Audio Technologies 

    FREE
    Open to the Public
  • Large-Scale Content-Based Matching of Audio and MIDI Data

    Date: 
    Tue, 01/13/2015 - 5:30pm - 7:30pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA Class Room [Knoll 217]
    Event Type: 
    DSP Seminar
    "Large-Scale Content-Based Matching of Audio and MIDI Data"
    FREE
    Open to the Public
  • Structural Segmentation of Music using Posteriori Features

    Date: 
    Tue, 10/28/2014 - 6:00pm - 7:00pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA Classroom [Knoll 217]
    Event Type: 
    DSP Seminar
     Abstract: Structural segmentation of music involves identifying boundaries between homogenous regions where the homogeneity involves one or more musical dimensions, and therefore depends on the musical genre. In this work, we address the segmentation of Hindustani instrumental concert recordings at the highest time-scale, that is, concert sections marked by prominent changes in rhythmic structure. Tempo features are effectively combined with energy and chroma features motivated by musicological knowledge and acoustic observations. Posterior probability features from unsupervised model fitting of the frame level acoustic features are shown to significantly improve robustness to local acoustic variations.
    FREE
    Open to the Public
  • Banging Like an 808? Developing a Physically-Informed, Circuit-Bendable, Digital Model of the Roland TR-808 Rhythm Composer

    Date: 
    Mon, 03/03/2014 - 5:30pm - 7:00pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA Classroom
    Event Type: 
    DSP Seminar
    Can a digital system provide satisfactory emulations of classic analog musical instruments and effects? Polarized reactions to the impending release (this month!) of Roland's TR-8 Rhythm Performer (a digitally modeled TR-808/909) have reignited this old debate. I've focused my research on creating physically-informed, circuit-bendable, digital models of analog drum machines. At this DSP Seminar, I'll present my methodological framework and analysis/models of one of the 808's most famous sound generators: the bass drum. My digital model, implemented in Cycling 74's Gen~, retain the salient features of the original analog drum machine and allow for accurate emulation of circuit-bending and common 808 mods. This work takes an engineering approach to hacking and circuit bending, clears up misconceptions about the 808's circuitry, and plugs a conspicuous drum-machine-shaped gap in virtual analog research.
    FREE
    Open to the Public
  • ISSE: An Interactive Source Separation Editor, Part II

    Date: 
    Tue, 11/12/2013 - 5:30pm - 6:45pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA Classroom
    Event Type: 
    DSP Seminar

    Abstract:  In the second talk of a two-part series, we will further discuss ISSE--an interactive source separation editor.  As described earlier, ISSE is a new, open-source, freely available, cross-platform audio editing software tool which enables a user to perform single-channel source separation by painting on time-frequency visualizations of sound. It is useful for a variety of music- and audio-related tasks such as music remixing, audio denoising, and audio-based forensics.   

    FREE
    Open to the Public
  • ISSE: An Interactive Source Separation Editor, Part I

    Date: 
    Tue, 10/29/2013 - 5:30pm - 6:45pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA Classroom
    Event Type: 
    DSP Seminar

    Abstract:  In the first talk of a two part-series, we will introduce ISSE--an interactive source separation editor.  ISSE is a new, open-source, freely available, cross-platform audio editing software tool which enables a user to perform single-channel source separation by painting on time-frequency visualizations of sound. It is useful for a variety of music- and audio-related tasks such as music remixing, audio denoising, and audio-based forensics.  In addition, we will discuss how to use the software, give demos, provide tips and tricks on achieving the high-quality separation, and outline limitations of the software. For more information, please see http://isse.sourceforge.net

    FREE
    Open to the Public
  • Source Separation Tutorial Mini-Series III: Extensions and Interpretations to Non-Negative Matrix Factorization

    Date: 
    Tue, 04/16/2013 - 5:30pm - 7:30pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA Classroom
    Event Type: 
    DSP Seminar

    Abstract: Building off the last two lectures in the series, we will continue our discussion on non-negative matrix factorization techniques for source separation.  We will talk about common extensions, additional interpretations, methods of evaluation, and if time permits, future directions of research.  Following the lecture, we will get a chance to program and improve our basic separator from the second lecture. Please bring your laptops with Matlab and/or Octave installed and be ready to code!

    Slides + Code @ https://ccrma.stanford.edu/~njb/teaching/sstutorial/

    FREE
    Open to the Public
  • Source Separation Tutorial Mini-Series II: Introduction to Non-Negative Matrix Factorization

    Date: 
    Tue, 04/09/2013 - 5:30pm - 7:30pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA Classroom
    Event Type: 
    DSP Seminar

    Abstract: For the second talk in this series, we will introduce the topic of non-negative matrix factorization for the purpose of single-channel source separation.  NMF is one of the current most promising and effective class of approaches found for source separation and is a popular topic in several signal processing conferences and journals.  Following the lecture, we will get a chance to program a basic source separator. Please bring your laptops with Matlab and/or Octave installed and be ready to code!

    Slides + Code @ https://ccrma.stanford.edu/~njb/teaching/sstutorial/

    FREE
    Open to the Public