Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics

Summer Workshops 2015 Announced!

2015 Summer Workshop lineup announced! Check https://ccrma.stanford.edu/workshops for details. Register http://app.certain.com/profile/form/index.cfm?PKformID=0x1979858dec1.

Upcoming Events

Naomi Harte - ViSQOL, An objective measure for speech quality

Date: 
Fri, 05/01/2015 - 11:30am - 1:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Seminar Room (Top Floor of the Knoll)
Event Type: 
Hearing Seminar
This talk gives an overview of ViSQOL – the Virtual Speech Quality Objective Listener. It is a signal-based, full-reference, intrusive metric that models human speech quality perception using a spectro-temporal measure of similarity between a reference and a test speech signal. The metric has been designed to be particularly robust for quality issues associated with Voice over IP (VoIP) transmission. The talk will explore how the original idea for associating visual similarity with spectrogram changes developed. I’ll show results from a full evaluation of the metric against PESQ and POLQA in a range of scenarios, including how it handles VoIP degradations. The research to develop ViSQOL was sponsored by Google Chrome in Mountainview CA.   Bio: Dr.
FREE
Open to the Public

Don Knuth: Constraint-based composition

Date: 
Thu, 05/07/2015 - 5:15pm - 6:15pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom (Room 217)
Event Type: 
Guest Lecture
Don Knuth will come and discuss/explain the peculiar(?) methods that he is using as he tries to compose a major work for pipe organ.
Biography
FREE
Open to the Public

Pat Scandalis - Physically Modeled Musical Instruments on Mobile Devices

Date: 
Thu, 05/14/2015 - 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Location: 
Classroom
Event Type: 
Guest Colloquium
Handheld mobile computing devices are now ubiquitous. These devices are powerful, connected and equipped with a variety of sensors. Their pervasiveness has created an opportunity to realize parametrically controlled, physically modeled, virtual musical instruments. moForte inc was founded to develop a line of sonic and musical applications for handheld devices. We developed the "moForte Guitar Stack" which models the guitar family of instruments. This stack has been used to used to develop applications for mobile devices.

We give an overview of the history of physical modeling with many sound examples, and then brief overview of the current state of modeling on mobile devices using a few apps based on the moForte Guitar Stack.
FREE
Open to the Public
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Recent Events

John Woodruff on Machine Listening: What do they hear and why?

Date: 
Fri, 04/10/2015 - 11:30am - 12:45pm
Location: 
CCRMA Seminar Room (Top Floor of the Knoll)
Event Type: 
Hearing Seminar
Whenever our devices capture sound, audio systems are there to recognize what’s been said or turn down all that noise. But how do our phones, tablets, remotes, headphones, hearing aids and thermostats know what to listen to? Most systems use one or both of two assumptions – 1) I’m listening for speech, 2) the sound I want came from that direction. Robust speech recognition systems are perhaps the most ubiquitous realizations of the first assumption. Large-scale training on noisy speech embeds the capability to “listen for speech”, but such systems are fundamentally limited when there are competing talkers.
FREE
Open to the Public

Hans Tutschku: Connection of Gesture and Space

Date: 
Wed, 04/08/2015 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
The Stage
Event Type: 
Guest Colloquium

The physical gesture of instrumentalists and dancers has been of great interest to me over the past 25 years. My musical education on the piano and later with live-electronics taught me aspects of music-making long before I thought to compose. Any music I have written, be it for instruments, singers or electronic sources, is searching for the expression of gestural phrasing, relationships between cause and effect (and their negation) and a plausibility carried over from our experiences outside of music.

Open to the Public

Xavier Serra - Music Information Retrieval from a Multicultural Perspective

Date: 
Mon, 04/06/2015 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom
Event Type: 
Guest Colloquium
Music is a universal phenomenon that manifests itself in every cultural context with a particular personality and the technologies supporting music have to take into account the specificities that every musical culture might have. This is particularly evident in the field of Music Information Retrieval, in which we aim at developing technologies to analyse, describe and explore any type of music. From this perspective we started the project CompMusic (http://compmusic.upf.edu) in which we focus on a number of MIR problems through the study of five music cultures: Hindustani (North India), Carnatic (South India), Turkish-makam (Turkey), Arab-Andalusian (Maghreb), and Beijing Opera (China).
FREE
Open to the Public

Robert Henke shares his favorite sound design tricks with Ableton Live and Max4Live

Date: 
Sat, 04/04/2015 - 10:00am - 4:00pm
Location: 
Knoll Stage, Stanford University Campus
Event Type: 
Guest Lecture

A software as complex as Ableton Live offers many ways to manipulate sound. Some are obvious and some are hidden. Robert Henke shows some examples of creative work with the software, and provides insight into more complex and iterative processes involved in his work flow. The workshop will also deal with questions of sound quality, the idea of 'good sound' and how to achieve this in a real world situation during a performance. In the second part of the workshop Robert Henke will dive into some of his Max4Live devices and will discuss the reasoning for developing own patches or tools. When does it help the creative process and when does it become a distraction?

FREE
Open to the Public
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Recent News

Review: Auditory Hallucinations, Composed

Congratulations to Jonathan Berger for more great reviews of his "Visitations!"

How Music Hijacks Our Perception of Time

Very interesting article by Dr. Jonathan Berger! "One evening, some 40 years ago, I got lost in time. I was at a performance of Schubert’s String Quintet in C major. During the second movement I had the unnerving feeling that time was literally grinding to a halt. The sensation was powerful, visceral, overwhelming. It was a life-changing moment, or, as it felt at the time, a life-changing eon.
 
It has been my goal ever since to compose music that usurps the perceived flow of time and commandeers the sense of how time passes. Although I’ve learned to manipulate subjective time, I still stand in awe of Schubert’s unparalleled power.

Holly Herndon's New Single Named Best New Track on Pitchfork

Congratulations to our own Holly Herndon, once again in the news!

"In reviewing electronic music composer Holly Herndon’s breakout debut, 2012's Movement, we noted her penchant for "Bending one person's voice into phantasmagorias", which continues on her newest, breath-halting single, “Chorus”." Read more, and watch video here...

Turning brain waves into music helps spot seizures

The music is eerie, if not altogether aesthetically pleasing. Like a soundtrack moments before a film's horrifying twist, the sounds of the brain in a state of seizure betrays the plot with little more than a skin-prickling crescendo.
 
This music, the electrical activity of the seizing brain translated to sound, is a merger of art and medicine, the work of Stanford's Dr. Josef Parvizi, an epilepsy specialist, and Chris Chafe, a composer and music researcher. 

Tricking the brain

Most interns don’t deliberately try to deceive executives at their employer’s company, but Dolby intern Jimmy Tobin was asked to do just that.
 
For a reception following a day of meetings for the company’s 90 top leaders, Tobin, a student of symbolic systems at Stanford University, and fellow interns working in the Science Group with Senior Staff Scientist Poppy Crum were asked to create a series of demonstrations of perceptual illusions.
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