Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics

Summer Workshops 2015 Announced!

2015 Summer Workshop lineup announced! Check https://ccrma.stanford.edu/workshops for details. Register http://app.certain.com/profile/form/index.cfm?PKformID=0x1979858dec1.

Hans Tutschku @ CCRMA: 4/6 ... 4/10 2015

04/08: Colloquium, Listening Room: Connection of Gesture and Space
04/10: Concert, Braun Rehearsal Hall: Electroacoustic Works (with a full deployment of our 3D speaker array)
Music 222 master classes

Upcoming Events

Robert Henke: Finding a New Audiovisual Language Using Lasers and Sound

Date: 
Wed, 04/01/2015 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
Knoll Stage
Event Type: 
Colloquium
Robert Henke talks about his laser based performance project Lumière II which just premiered at Centre George Pompidou in Paris, and provides insight into the artistic and technical challenges of the project.

Artist Bio:

Robert Henke, born 1969 in Munich, Germany, builds and operates machines that create sounds, shapes and structures.
FREE
Open to the Public

Robert Henke shares his favorite sound design tricks with Ableton Live and Max4Live

Date: 
Sat, 04/04/2015 - 10:00am - 4:00pm
Location: 
Knoll Stage, Stanford University Campus
Event Type: 
Guest Lecture

A software as complex as Ableton Live offers many ways to manipulate sound. Some are obvious and some are hidden. Robert Henke shows some examples of creative work with the software, and provides insight into more complex and iterative processes involved in his work flow. The workshop will also deal with questions of sound quality, the idea of 'good sound' and how to achieve this in a real world situation during a performance. In the second part of the workshop Robert Henke will dive into some of his Max4Live devices and will discuss the reasoning for developing own patches or tools. When does it help the creative process and when does it become a distraction?

FREE
Open to the Public

Xavier Serra - Music Information Retrieval from a Multicultural Perspective

Date: 
Mon, 04/06/2015 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom
Event Type: 
Guest Colloquium
Music is a universal phenomenon that manifests itself in every cultural context with a particular personality and the technologies supporting music have to take into account the specificities that every musical culture might have. This is particularly evident in the field of Music Information Retrieval, in which we aim at developing technologies to analyse, describe and explore any type of music. From this perspective we started the project CompMusic (http://compmusic.upf.edu) in which we focus on a number of MIR problems through the study of five music cultures: Hindustani (North India), Carnatic (South India), Turkish-makam (Turkey), Arab-Andalusian (Maghreb), and Beijing Opera (China).
FREE
Open to the Public
Syndicate content

Recent Events

David A. Jaffe: From 'Silicon Valley Breakdown' to 'The Space Between Us' - 30 years of spatial music with computers

Date: 
Wed, 03/04/2015 - 5:15pm - 6:15pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom (Room 217)
Event Type: 
Guest Colloquium
Please join us for a guest colloquium by composer and CCRMA alumnus, Daivd A. Jaffe before his concert later in the evening - 7:30pm on the CCRMA stage.
FREE
Open to the Public

Internal Research Colloquium: Jonathan Abel; Kurt James Werner and Vaibhav Nangia; Romain Michon and Ge Wang

Date: 
Wed, 02/25/2015 - 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom (Room 217)
Event Type: 
Internal Colloquium
Please join us for conference-style presentations from Jonathan Abel; Kurt James Werner and Vaibhav Nangia; and Romain Michon and Ge Wang!

Mr. Cable's Low-Fi Reverberator
by Jonathan Abel

A computational structure capable of producing distorted, pitch manipulated reverberation is described.  The distortion is virtually free of intermodulation products, making it appropriate for use with material having dense harmonies.   The pitch manipulation permits large pitch shifts as well as a kind of scrambling of the frequency axis, including an effect similar to pitch inversion.  Sound examples, including distorted room and spring reverberation, two-octave pitch shifting and an inverted guitar, are presented
FREE
Open to the Public

Cristina Valdés - 20th and 21st Century Piano Music

Date: 
Wed, 02/18/2015 - 7:30pm - 9:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Stage
Event Type: 
Concert

Pianist Cristina Valdés will perform a program of 20th and 21st Century Piano Music. The program will include music by Robert Platz, Helmut Lachenmann, Giacinto Scelsi, and Jonathan Harvey.

 

FREE
Open to the Public

Raitis Smits - Emerging Techno-Ecological Art Practices - the Poetics of Green Energy

Date: 
Wed, 02/18/2015 - 5:15pm - 6:45pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom
Event Type: 
Guest Colloquium
Today we are witnessing the transformation process from new media to post media situation which is characterized not only by equality and convergence of different media technologies but also by emergence of new "techno-ecological" paradigm. Artists, like those from the Renewable Network who once were in vanguard exploring digital frontiers, today are among those who are engaged in the quest for a more sustainable future. By working together with scientists and farmers, urban gardeners and rural communities, media archeologists and future visionaries, the artists are bringing to foreground ecological issues, yet staying rooted in new media.
FREE
Open to the Public
Syndicate content

Recent News

Holly Herndon's New Single Named Best New Track on Pitchfork

Congratulations to our own Holly Herndon, once again in the news!

"In reviewing electronic music composer Holly Herndon’s breakout debut, 2012's Movement, we noted her penchant for "Bending one person's voice into phantasmagorias", which continues on her newest, breath-halting single, “Chorus”." Read more, and watch video here...

Turning brain waves into music helps spot seizures

The music is eerie, if not altogether aesthetically pleasing. Like a soundtrack moments before a film's horrifying twist, the sounds of the brain in a state of seizure betrays the plot with little more than a skin-prickling crescendo.
 
This music, the electrical activity of the seizing brain translated to sound, is a merger of art and medicine, the work of Stanford's Dr. Josef Parvizi, an epilepsy specialist, and Chris Chafe, a composer and music researcher. 

Tricking the brain

Most interns don’t deliberately try to deceive executives at their employer’s company, but Dolby intern Jimmy Tobin was asked to do just that.
 
For a reception following a day of meetings for the company’s 90 top leaders, Tobin, a student of symbolic systems at Stanford University, and fellow interns working in the Science Group with Senior Staff Scientist Poppy Crum were asked to create a series of demonstrations of perceptual illusions.

Stanford scientists build a 'brain stethoscope' to turn seizures into music

When Chris Chafe and Josef Parvizi began transforming recordings of brain activity into music, they did so with artistic aspirations. The professors soon realized, though, that the work could lead to a powerful biofeedback tool for identifying brain patterns associated with seizures. Read more here...
Syndicate content