Academics

CCRMA is a part of the Department of Music at Stanford University. Classes and seminars taught at the center are open to registered Stanford students and visiting scholars. The facility is also available to registered Stanford students and visiting scholars for research projects which coincide with ongoing work at the center.

 

Graduate Programs Overview:

Prospective graduate students especially interested in the work at CCRMA should apply to the degree program at Stanford most closely aligned with their specific field of study, e.g., Music, Electrical Engineering, Computer Science, Psychology, etc. Graduate degree programs offered in music include the MA/MST in Music, Science, and Technology, the DMA in Composition, and the PhD in Computer-Based Music Theory and Acoustics. Acceptance in music theory or composition is largely based upon musical criteria, not knowledge of computing. Admission requirements for degree programs can be obtained directly from each particular department. CCRMA does not itself offer a degree.

Courses

Following is a list of all courses that have been taught at CCRMA.  For complete information on course offerings, please see the Stanford Bulletin (http://bulletin.stanford.edu) for the current academic year.

For information on which courses have been taught in recent quarters, please visit the Course History page.

 

Course History

The following are course websites from previous terms that are still available online.


Autumn 2007

Music 158
Soundwire Ensemble 

Winter 2007
Music 220B Compositional Algorithms, Psychoacoustics, and Spatial Processing

Winter 2006
Music 220B Compositional Algorithms, Psychoacoustics, and Spatial Processing

Winter 2005

Music 220b Compositional Algorithms, Psychoacoustics and Spatial Processing

Winter 2004

Music 220b Compositional Algorithms, Psychoacoustics and Spatial Processing

Fall 2003

Music 120 Auditory Remapping of Bioinformatics
Music 120Z Musique Concréte in the Digital Era
Music 220A Foundations of Computer-Generated Sound

Winter 2003

Music 220b Synthesis Techniques, Compositional Algorithms, Psychoacoustics and Spatial Processing

Fall 2002

Music 250a Computer-Human Interaction Technology

Summer 2002

Workshops 200

Winter 2002
Music 120 Introduction to sonification

Music 220b Synthesis Techniques, Compositional Algorithms, Psychoacoustics and Spatial Processing


Fall 2001
Music 220a Fundamentals of Computer-Generated Sound


Summer 2001
Workshops 2001

Spring 2001
Music 423 CCRMA DSP Seminar

Winter 2001
Music 192b Advanced Sound Recording Technology
Music 220b Synthesis Techniques, Compositional Algorithms, Psychoacoustics and Spatial Processing
Music 253 Musical Information
Music 420 Applications of the Fast Fourier Transform
Music 422 Perceptual Audio Coding
Music 423 Digital Signal Processing Research Seminar

Fall 2000
Music 220a Fundamentals of Computer-Generated Sound

Summer 2000
Sophomore College 2000
Workshops 2000

Spring 2000
Music 120 Interactive Computer Music
Music 154 History of Electroacoustic Music
Music 421 Signal Processing Methods in Musical Acoustics

Winter 2000
Music 151 Psychophysics and Cognitive Psychology
Music 192B Advanced Sound Recording Technology
Music 220B Compositional Algorithms, Psychoacoustics and Spatial Processing
Music 420 Applications of the Fast Fourier Transform
Music 422 Perceptual Audio Coding

Fall 1999
Music 150 Musical Acoustics
Music 192A Fundamentals of Sound Recording
Music 220A Fundamentals of Computer Generated Sound
Music 320 Introduction to Digital Audio Signal Processing and the DFT
Music CS377B Human-Computer Interaction Technology

Summer 1999
Workshops 1999

Spring 1999
Music 120 Intro to Music Composition and Programming using MIDI-Based Systems
Music 421 Signal Processing Methods in Musical Acoustics
Music 422 Perceptual Audio Coding
Music 423 Grad. Seminar in Signal Processing Research

Winter 1999
Music 220B Compositional Algorithms, Psychoacoustics and Spatial Processing
Music 423 Grad. Seminar in Signal Processing Research

Fall 1998
Music 149 Instrumental Music with Electronics
Music 151 Psychophysics and Cognitive Psychology for Musicians
Music 220A Fundamentals of Computer Generated Sound
Music 423 Grad. Seminar in Signal Processing Research

Summer 1998
Workshops 1998

Spring 1998

Music 192e Workshop in Orchestration
Music 422 Perceptual Audio Coding

Winter 1998
Music 14q Topics in Interactive Computer-Music Performance
Music 220b Compositional Algorithms, Psychoacoustics and Spatial Processing
Music 420 Short-Time Fourier Transform Theory and Audio Applications

Fall 1997
Music 220a Fundamentals of Computer Generated Sound

Summer 1997
Summer Workshops

Spring 1997
Music 154 Introduction to Computer and Electronic Music
Music 192b Creative Processes in Popular Music Recording
Music 254 Music Representation and Computer Analysis: Seminar

Winter 1997
Music 120 Introduction to Music Composition and Programming Using MIDI-Based Systems
Music 252b Topics in Computer Music: Perceptual Audio Coding
Music 253 Musical Information: An Introduction

Fall 1996
Music 220a Fundamentals of Computer Generated Sound
Music 252a Human Computer Interface Design
Lisp Workshop for Musicians

Summer 1996
Summer Workshops

Spring 1996
Music 154 Introduction to Computer and Electronic Music
Music 220b Algorithmic Composition Techniques

Undergrad Program

Bachelor of Arts in Music with a Concentration in Music, Science and Technology

The Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) does not directly offer an undergraduate degree, however students of the Stanford Music Department can choose to major or minor in Music with a concentration in Music, Science and Technology. 

The MST specialization is designed for those students with a strong interest in the musical ramifications of rapidly evolving computer technology and digital audio and in the acoustic and psychoacoustic foundations of music. The program entails a substantial research project under faculty guidance and makes use of the highly multi-disciplinary environment at CCRMA. This program can serve as a complementary major to students in the sciences and engineering.

For more information, visit the Stanford Music Department and the Stanford Bulletin.

Masters Program

 The Master's degree in Music, Science, and Technology

Description:  The MA in Music, Science and Technology (MA/MST) degree is a two-year degree granted at the successful completion of specific coursework.  The CCRMA MA/MST program is designed for candidates having an undergraduate engineering, science, music or arts degree, or a degree that includes course work in engineering mathematics. CCRMA is a research center within the Department of Music in the School of Humanities and Sciences at Stanford University. CCRMA's courses and research topics include music perception, music related signal processing, human-computer interaction, synthesis, and inter-media.

Application:  Please see Application Procedures on the Dept. of Music's website.

Fees:  The application fee is $125 and may be paid using Visa, Mastercard cards.  

Writing Samples:  All applicants to the Music, Science, and Technology MA program are required to submit a writing sample demonstrating scholarly research. Supporting materials will be returned if you provide monetary equivalent of U.S. currency, not international return coupons.

GRE Tests:  GRE scores are required of all graduate applicants to Stanford University.  Applications will NOT be considered without GRE scores! Please visit the Educational Testing website for details about test dates and locations:  http://www.ets.org/ 

Stanford Bulletin:  Degree requirements for the MAMST can be found on Stanford University's exploredegrees site. Scroll down to 4. Music, Science, and Technology.

CCRMA Faculty Bios:  You may wish to peruse the faculty bios to find faculty having areas of interest and expertise that match your own.  Feel free to email those with whom you are interested in discussing a particular program:  http://music.stanford.edu/People/faculty.html

The Stanford Music Department: More information on graduate programs in music can be found on the Music Department site:   music.stanford.edu/Academics/gradStudies.html


Course List File Attachment:

File Attachment: 

PhD Program

Applying to the Ph.D. program

CCRMA offers a Ph.D. program in Computer-Based Music Theory and Acoustics. Since CCRMA is multidisciplinary, we have Ph.D. students in several departments. While all CCRMA faculty are formally within the Music department, Julius Smith also holds a courtesy appointment in Electrical Engineering which enables him to serve as primary thesis advisor for Ph.D. students in EE, and Ge Wang holds a courtesy appointment in Computer Science and can serve as primary thesis advisor for Ph.D students in CS. We also have occasional Ph.D. students from Mechanical Engineering, Psychology, and the like. Application for graduate study is handled by the corresponding department. CCRMA does not process admissions itself. However, when an EE student expresses an interest in music-related research, Prof. Smith is usually asked to comment on the student's prospects for pursuing research at CCRMA.  CCRMA faculty also participate in the selection of Music Department Ph.D. students interested in CCRMA research.

 

More Information:

You may download a .pdf file about the programs in the Stanford Bulletin.

Also see the Music Department site for a discussion of the graduate programs in music.

Please read the Registrar's information about applying to Stanford.

A copy of the Guide to Graduate Admissions is available here.

Visiting Scholar

CRITERIA FOR APPOINTMENT
The following are the minimum eligibility criteria for a Visiting Scholar designation at Stanford University:

APPLICATION and APPOINTMENT PROCEDURE
Email a letter of proposal to Nette Worthey (networth@ccrma.stanford.edu) and include the following: After the CCRMA staff and faculty review your initial proposal; you will be notified whether your proposal is accepted or denied by CCRMA. If it is accepted you will be asked to submit additional paperwork to be reviewed by the Registrar's Office.
VISA REQUESTS FOR VISITING SCHOLARS FROM OTHER COUNTRIES
Citizens of other countries who enter the United States for the purpose of being Visiting Scholar at Stanford must have a DS-2019 (certification for J-1 visa status) issued by the Bechtel International Center via CCRMA prior to their arrival in this country.
 If you need Stanford to sponsor a visa for your visit, please submit the following documents:
Last minute visa requests cannot be honored.

FEE
The fee to CCRMA is $600 USD per quarter and this fee offsets direct costs involved with the use of CCRMA facilities.  The fee may be paid to CCRMA Administrator Nette Worthey in a check or Money Order made out to Stanford University.  Visiting scholars are responsible for their own financial support, health insurance, and housing. Stanford University also requires a fee of $125 USD to process or transfer the visa certificate.

PRIVILEGES
Accepted Scholars are invited to work on their own research and to participate in informal discussions and seminars with the CCRMA Community of composers, researchers, and other visitors during their stay. CCRMA provides its scholars with access to facilities, courses, and seminars and limited technical support.  Please be aware that visitors must work VERY indendently.  CCRMA is a collaborative working envirnment but visitors should plan on working on their own.  The building enjoyes an open space office environment and an office will NOT be assigned to any visitor.  There are plenty of computers and space in which to work.

Visiting Scholar status is a privilege, not a right, and an individual holds this status at the pleasure of Stanford University. The status may be revoked at any time (even during the term of the designated status) by either party, without the necessity of a reason. Similarly, there is no right to a renewal of the status at the end of the term.

Visiting Scholars are not employees or students of the University, and therefore are not entitled to Stanford compensation or other benefits available to regular staff, faculty or students (including health insurance). The Visiting Scholar title may not be used for personnel or payroll purposes. If a department wishes to make a special payment to a Visiting Scholar for participation in a seminar presentation or similar contribution, that should be done through honoraria. If a Visiting Scholar is asked to make a short-term contribution to a research effort, payment of appropriate consulting fees should be arranged.

A Visiting Scholar Identification Card will be issued to Visiting Scholars who are in residence for a minimum of one quarter. If accepted as a CCRMA visiting scholar, details will be included in your letter of invitation. 

Visiting Student Researcher

BACKGROUND
Faculty at CCRMA are sometimes asked to supervise the research of visitors who are not Visiting Scholars under current Stanford policy. The qualifications for appointment as a Visiting Scholar state that a person must hold a Ph.D. (or its equivalent from a country other than the United States) or be a recognized expert in the field. There are a limited number of instances, however, when it would be to the benefit of Stanford faculty to permit graduate students who have not yet attained the Ph.D. to engage in research on the Stanford campus using Stanford research facilities. Such instances might include students at other universities who are engaged in research at the doctoral level and who are doing research in a field of interest to a Stanford faculty member, or a student who is doing a laboratory rotation as part of a larger research study or grant.

When agreeing to invite such graduate students to conduct research at Stanford, CCRMA faculty is mindful of the need to place primary emphasis on providing research opportunities to regularly matriculated Stanford students. In addition, invited students must be qualified to conduct research at a level comparable to that of other Stanford graduate students, and the research must be of benefit to Stanford as well as the visitor. Visiting graduate students must work VERY INDEPENDENTLY at CCRMA in order to be successful.

ENROLLMENT STATUS
Any visiting graduate student who will be participating in research at Stanford for more than 30 days must be appointed into nonmatriculated student status as a Visiting Student Researcher. Students may be classified as Visiting Student Researchers if they are here fewer than 30 days. (No SUnet ID can be sponsored until the VSR appointment has been approved and processed by the Office of the University Registrar.)

Visiting Student Researchers will be registered in the category: "Non-Matriculated Graduate Students - Visiting Student Researchers" (VSR). They will be charged a monthly VSR fee, set annually by the Board of Trustees. Visiting Student Researchers will also be charged the quarterly Campus Health Services Fee, and, unless they document that they have comparable coverage with another carrier, they will be charged for student health insurance.
Persons registered in the VSR category are not permitted to enroll in any classes. If Visiting Student Researchers wish to take classes at Stanford, they should contact the Graduate Admissions, Office of the University Registrar, and request an application for nonmatriculated graduate student enrollment status. A complete application, including letters of recommendation, official transcripts and applicable test scores, would be required by the nonmatriculated application deadline set by Graduate Admissions, Office of the Registrar. Nonmatriculated students must register for a minimum of eight units and are charged the regular tuition rate.

Visiting Student Researchers from other U.S. universities who have educational loans cannot be certified by Stanford for loan deferments because they are neither matriculated at Stanford nor are they carrying a full-time course load. If the researcher is still matriculated at another university in the United States, s/he should contact their home institution regarding eligibility for loan deferments.

VSR status is valid for one year. The status may be extended once for an additional year.

APPLICATION PROCEDURES
Email a letter of proposal to Nette Worthey (networth@ccrma.stanford.edu) and include the following:

After the CCRMA staff and faculty review your initial proposal; you will be notified whether your proposal is accepted or denied by CCRMA. If it is accepted you will be asked to submit additional paperwork to be reviewed by the Registrars Office.


VISITING RESEARCHERS FROM OTHER COUNTRIES
Citizens of other countries who enter the United States for the purpose of being Visiting Student Researchers at Stanford must have a DS-2019 (certification for J-1 visa status) issued by the Bechtel International Center via CCRMA prior to their arrival in this country. Visiting Student Researchers must be registered throughout the period of their residence at Stanford, in order to maintain their visa status. Students from other countries will also need to complete a Declaration of Finances form to demonstrate that they have sufficient funds to pay the associated fees and to live in the U.S.

If you need Stanford to sponsor a visa for your visit, please submit the following documents:

Last minute visa requests cannot be honored.

PAYMENT / EMPLOYMENT
Visiting Student Researchers are responsible for paying the VSR fees and any other applicable fees. CCRMA does not have scholarships or funds available for financial support. Nor is CCRMA able to pay any fees on the researcher's behalf or to provide a stipend for living expenses.
Visiting researchers are not eligible to be paid as graduate research assistants or as graduate teaching assistants. They may not receive stipends from University scholarships/fellowships. Funds designated for the support of matriculated Stanford students may not be used to support Visiting Student Researchers. They may however be employed on an hourly basis to perform work, including work on a sponsored project assuming that the work is appropriate to the project and funds are available.

Note: When departments provide stipends or pay fees for non-matriculated students, these payments are considered taxable income to the researcher. If the student is a non-US resident for tax purposes, and their home country does not have a tax treaty with the United States, Stanford is obligated to withhold or charge 14% federal tax on any of these payments.
Visiting researchers must remain current in their payments to the University to maintain their Visiting Student Researcher status. Persons who are delinquent in their payments will lose their status and, if applicable, their J-1 visa status will be terminated.

FEES


SERVICES AVAILABLE
Persons who are registered as Visiting Student Researchers will be entitled to receive a student photo identification card. The card will permit entry and borrowing privileges from the library at the same level as other non-matriculated students and use of recreational facilities. Researchers will also be eligible to open computer accounts. These services will only be available during the months when the VSR fees have been paid. CCRMA will provide access to our facilities, courses and limited technical support.  CCRMA has an open space work environment and NO DESKS or OFFICES are assigned to visiting student researchers.

Graduate student housing is available, as for other non-matriculated students, only after all matriculated Stanford students have obtained housing. For the purposes of planning for housing, it is best to assume that student housing will not be available on campus for Visiting Student Researchers.

We wish you the best of luck in your application. If you have any questions, feel free to call us at (650) 723-4971 ex.300

 

Workshops 2014

CCRMA SUMMER WORKSHOPS 2014

6/23 - 6/27    Music Information Retrieval:  Jay LeBoeuf, Leigh Smith, Steve Tjoa
6/29 - 7/3      SuperCollider: Fernando Lopez Lezcano and Bruno Ruviaro
7/7 - 7/11      Audio Plug-Ins Designed with Faust: Romain Michon
7/14 - 7/18    Aspects of Sound in Art: Elaine Buckholtz and Sasha Leitman
7/21 - 7/25    WORKSHOP TO BE ANNOUNCED
7/28 - 8/1      Designing Musical Games :: Gaming Musical Design: Rob Hamilton and Chris Platz
8/4 - 8/8        Stompbox Design: Edgar Berdahl and Esteban Maestre
8/11 - 8/15    3D Printing for Acoustics :  John Granzow
8/18 - 8/22    Perceptual Audio Coding:  Marina Bosi and Rich Goldberg
8/25 - 8/29    New Music Controllers: Sasha Leitman and Michael Gurevich
 


 

GENERAL INFORMATION
The Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics offers intensive programs where top educators and researchers from the fields of music, engineering, and computer science will present a detailed study of specialized subjects. Each workshop is one week long. The workshops are open to the public. Most workshops are 9-5pm with an hour for lunch on your own, but check each workshop page for specific schedule information.

IMPORTANT NOTE
All workshops are subject to change or cancellation based on low enrollment. Any workshop with low enrollment will be cancelled 3 weeks before start date of workshop.

TUITION AND FEES
Course tuition, in general, is $450.  Additional fees may be associated for lab material (see course descriptions for lab fees).

ACADEMIC CREDIT
No academic credit is offered for participation in the workshops.

HOUSING
Housing costs are not included in the course fee.  Cardinal Hotel has special rates for CCRMA Workshop attendees. The hotel is located in downtown Palo Alto less than a mile from campus, and a couple blocks from where the Stanford free shuttle, the Marguerite, picks up to deliver you near the Knoll.   Register for housing at the Cardinal Hotel.

DIRECTIONS
Directions to the CCRMA Workshop held at the Knoll, 660 Lomita Drive, Stanford, CA can be found here: http://www.stanford.edu/home/visitors/maps.html

PARKING
Parking costs are not included in the course fee. Parking information can be found at the Stanford Parking and Transportation website: http://transportation.stanford.edu

CONTACT
Nette Worthey
CCRMA Administrator
660 Lomita Drive
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-8180
650-723-4971 x320
networth@ccrma.stanford.edu

REGISTRATION

All workshops held at CCRMA require a $50 non-refundable registration fee.