Edwards, J. Michele. Music: Discipline Analysis. Publication of the Women in the Curriculum series, ed. Elaine Hedges. Baltimore: National Center for Curriculum Transformation Resources on Women, Institute for Teaching and Research on Women, Towson University, 1997.

This includes a short essay about the impact of feminist theory on the music discipline plus an extensive bibliography of books/articles plus a segment on electronic resources.--author

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Shapiro, Anne Dhu. "Music and Gender: Another Look." Sonneck Society Bulletin XVII(2), 58-60. Third of a series of three articles, abstracted from a longer article appearing in The World of Music, Summer, 1991.

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Ferris, Lesley. "Absent Bodies, Dancing Bodies, Broken Dishes: Feminist Theory, Postmodernism, and the Visual Arts."

Very brief consideration of McClary's book (about 2 pp.); very positive view of role of Feminine Endings in challenging the idea of autonomous music.]

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Higgins, Paula. "Women in Music, Feminist Criticism, and Guerilla Musicology: Reflections on Recent Polemics."

Higgins provides an essay-by-essay review, and includes what she calls the "missing bibliography" of feminist works that laid the foundation for McClary's work.

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Kallick, Jenny. "Review of Susan McClary, Feminine Endings: Music, Gender, and Sexuality."

Kallick situates some of McClary's theoretical discrepancies within the tension between an anti-modernist and postmodernist view; also introduces gay criticism issues.

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Edwards, J. Michele. "Women and Music." National Women's Studies Association Journal 1/3 (Spring 1989), 506-518.

Review essay; reviews 14 recent books plus references to much additional scholarship from the 1980s. --author

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Boretz, Benjamin. " /music/consciousness/gender [videorecording]." Red Hook, NY : Open Space, 1996.

"Texts, musics, textsoundmusics, images for live speaker and prerecorded speakers, musics and images on audio and videotape." -- from cassette container.

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Edwards, J. Michele. "All Women's Musical Communities: Fostering Creativity and Leadership." In Bridges of Power: Women's Multicultural Alliances, ed. Lisa Albrecht and Rose Brewer, 95-107. Santa Cruz, CA: New Society Publishers, 1990.

Examines the International Sweethearts of Rhythm and Bay Area Women's Philharmonic to show the value of separatism which has supported women's leadership and assisted in developing their expertise.--author

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Edwards, J. Michele. Music: Discipline Analysis. Publication of the Women in the Curriculum series, ed. Elaine Hedges. Baltimore: National Center for Curriculum Transformation Resources on Women, Institute for Teaching and Research on Women, Towson University, 1997.

This includes a short essay about the impact of feminist theory on the music discipline plus an extensive bibliography of books/articles plus a segment on electronic resources.--author

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Ericson, Margaret. Women and music: A Selective Annotated Bibliography on Women and Gender Issues in Music, 1987-1992. New York: G.K. Hall; London: Prentice Hall International, 1996.

Bibliography of women in music sources from 1987-1992, including books, recordings, scores, videos, films, articles, dissertations, newspapers, online information sources/databases, and conference proceedings; many are annotated.

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Edwards, J. Michele. "Choral Potpourri: Literature by Women Composers." ChoralNet Resource Site (FTP and Gopher).

Annotated list including voicing, publishers, recordings, timings, text sources, and miscellaneous comments. - author Back to bibliography



Greer, David. A Numerous and Fashionable Audience: The Story of Elsie Swinton. London: Thames Publishing, 1997.

Elsie Swinton (1874-1966), née Ebsworth, was a prominent society lady in Edwardian England, who in 1906 took the unusual step (for a person of her social rank in those days) of becoming a professional singer, and in the years up to the First World War she had a successful career despite family opposition. She was also of striking appearance, and there are portraits of her by Sargent, Sickert and others. In her singing career she worked with well-known musicians such as Hamilton Harty, Percy Grainger and Gabriel Fauré (who was one of her many admirers). She also kept open house to many, including Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Szymanowski and Arthur Rubinstein. After the war, opposition from the family and other factors led her to abandon her career and she turned to good works and exploration of arcane philosophies.

Although British, she actually grew up in St Petersburg, and left vivid accounts of life in pre-Revolution Russia.

This book is based on unpublished memoirs by Elsie and other members of the family. It includes an appendix of hitherto unknown lettersto her from Fauré.--author

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