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    Capasso, A. & Keller, D. Sisyphus / Sísifo 2004 Installation for Dual Video  misc URL 
    Abstract: Title: Sisyphus Video: Ariadna Capasso Sound: Damián Keller Duration: 6’00” and 16’00” Year: 2003-4 Media: Two video projections & surround sound.

    Sisyphus / Síifo is a video installation that consists of two large projection screens standing side by side. A massive stone cross behind a clear blue sky stands impassive on one screen. On the second, a flurry of activity endlessly takes place. A group of men haul loads of plantains from shore, onto a ship and up the stairs. The video of Sisyphus extends in time. This litany of images, repeating over and over with slight variations, is what transports the audience into the world of the workers, the process of time passing leads to empathy, and only then the multiple layers and connections to us appear.

    Galou Gallery, Brooklyn, NY. http://galeriagalou.com/ariadna4.html

    Funded by Manhattan Community Arts Fund, LMCC, Individual Artist Grant 2004

    Review: http://galeriagalou.com/ariadna4.html

    http://www.denorteasur.com/asp/articulo.asp?numero=277&id=4026

    BibTeX:
    @misc{Capasso2004,
      author = {Capasso, A. and Keller, D.},
      title = {Sisyphus / Sísifo},
      year = {2004},
      note = {New York, NY: Consulate General of Argentina},
      url = {http://www.perpetualartmachine.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.ShowItem&g2_itemId=4908}
    }
    
    Capasso, A., Keller, D. & Tinajero, P. The Urban Corridor / Corredor Urbano 2000 Installation for Activity Recognition System  misc URL 
    Abstract: The Urban Corridor explores the relationship between the public, visual and sonic stimuli, and space as a way of bringing to life the effect of the urban landscape on our day-to-day interactions. We focused on two issues: (1) the interactions between visual and musical processes, time and space, context and materials, and the role of the public in the piece, and (2) the accumulation of elements as a means of sonic organization and transformation.

    The audience is an essential part of The Urban Corridor since it is the body that activates the space. Without people, the installation remains mostly dark and quiet. The visitor cannot see the entire space at once. For example, on entering the installation the walls obstruct the view of the video projection. The progressive unfolding of visual and sonic elements encourages exploration. And most importantly, the pace in which this exploration takes place defines the temporal shape of the piece. The reverberant characteristics of the space change the way sounds are heard, but also the position of the listener with respect to the speakers modifies the perceived delay among the events. Finally, the reaction of the audience to the stimuli in the corridor shapes their behavior and, in turn, also shapes the temporal distribution of the sonic and visual events establishing a feedback dynamic.

    Rhizome.org (website), 2003

    Electronic Easel (curated by Simon Zalkind), CU Fine Art Galleries, Boulder, CO, 2000

    Review: http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.bbp2372.2002.061

    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09298215.2011.594514

    BibTeX:
    @misc{Capasso2000,
      author = {Capasso, A. and Keller, D. and Tinajero, P.},
      title = {The Urban Corridor / Corredor Urbano},
      year = {2000},
      note = {Boulder, CO: CU Art Galleries},
      url = {http://www.patriciatinajerostudio.com/collaborations/urban-corridor}
    }
    
    Capasso, A., Tinajero, P. & Keller, D. Carry On, Carry Away: Homeless Journeys Through the U.S. 2001 Installation  misc URL 
    Abstract: The Carry On – Carry Away: Homeless Journeys Through the U.S. project is the result of two and a half years of working with, interviewing, and virtually traveling with homeless people from New York City and Boulder, Colorado.

    We followed the movements of three individuals. Wherever they went, we kept in touch via e-mail, phone, or post cards, and they told us about their journey, where they traveled and lodged, what they ate and their adventures on the road. We recorded these conversations to make a sound and video installation that combines large portraits, two journey books, a portable bed, and a swinging door.

    The first journey book consists of images of the objects necessary for day to day living. It stands on its own, crossing the gallery. It acts as a road.

    The second book is 15 feet long and extends from the wall and along the floor into the audience’s space. It includes images of maps, postcards and places, and records the travels of three homeless individuals.

    In the installation space there is a circle of human-sized curtains depicting the individuals we followed. The circle is accompanied by a monitor that shows someone carefully ironing a beautiful curtain. The video focuses on the face and hands with a surreal, almost dreamlike imagery to contrast with the audio that tells a true story of a homeless man, Danny Moon, who has chosen this nomadic lifestyle to be free from home, and therefore society.

    The audio is extended throughout the space and guides visitors along toward the next section. The sound compositions are phrases culled from our interviews, and combine with bus, train station, and other urban noises to stimulate our senses, and to place us into this unknown environment.

    A swinging door represents the psychological space between known and unknown, private and public, yet offers neither, because the piece responds as art object within the gallery setting. This threshold represents departure and arrival; the sculpture looks like a doorframe or a skeleton structure.

    After walking through, or around, the threshold sculpture, the viewer-visitor enters a dark inner room. The Performative Bed is a series of performances with a suitcase-bed. This is a foldable wooden bed hinged in three parts that is transported in its own case. The object was designed to fit within the size limitations of airline travel. We place this portable bed in different locations that houseless individuals identify as their home turf, for example Pearl Street Mall and Boulder Creek in Boulder, Central Park and 5th Avenue in New York City. We install and use the bed and invite curious passer-bys to participate. The performances represent the negotiation between the private versus the public sphere. This intervention underscores the conflict faced by homeless people forced to temporarily appropriate public space for private use. The bed-suitcase symbolizes our cultural baggage. Lugging it around shows our personal negotiation between cultures.

    Traveler, The Dalton Gallery, Agnes Scott College, Decatur, Georgia, 2005.

    Art Basel Miami Beach, Ethan Cole Gallery, Miami, FL, 2004.

    Homeless & Prostitutes, Galería Galou, Williamsburg, NY, 2003

    Hatton Gallery, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, 2003.

    Canyon Gallery, Boulder Public Library, Boulder, CO, 2002.

    Rocky Mountain Peace and Justice Center, Boulder, CO, 2001.

    Review: http://www.hamilton.edu/magazine/news200606.cfm?id=10849

    http://daltongallery.agnesscott.edu/traveler/capassotinajero.html

    ‘Carry On’: Exhibit, Installation examines relationship between the houseless and their stuff.

    J. Gluckstern. The Daily Camera. December 13, pp. 18-19, 2002

    Exhibit focuses on homeless. Joe Southern. The Daily Times-Call. December 2002

    2001 Home is Where the Art Is. Michael de Yoanna. Colorado Daily on-line. December 16 2002

    ‘Carry On’ art show examines lives of homeless. J. Gluckstern. The Daily Camera. December 16 2002

    Artists Look at Homelessness. Jessika Fruchter. Colorado Daily. October 9, pp. 4-5, 2002

    BibTeX:
    @misc{Capasso2001,
      author = {Ariadna Capasso and Patricia Tinajero and Keller, D.},
      title = {Carry On, Carry Away: Homeless Journeys Through the U.S.},
      year = {2001},
      url = {http://www.patriciatinajerostudio.com/collaborations/carry}
    }
    
    Keller, D. toco y me voy / touch'n'go 1999 Performance Art for Biligual Actor and Eight-Channel Tape  misc URL 
    Abstract: CCRMA, Stanford, CA, 2000

    Western Front, Vancouver, BC, 1999

    Review: http://130.102.44.246/journals/leonardo_music_journal/v010/10.1keller.html
    BibTeX:
    @misc{Keller1999b,
      author = {Keller, D.},
      title = {toco y me voy / touch'n'go},
      publisher = {Burnaby, BC: earsay productions},
      year = {1999},
      note = {Vancouver, BC: earsay productions},
      url = {http://www.earsay.com/soundshop/earsaycds/CDs/tng.html}
    }
    
    Keller, D. A(men) 2005 Installation  misc  
    Abstract: Site-specific installation for bathroom.
    BibTeX:
    @misc{Keller2005b,
      author = {Keller, D.},
      title = {A(men)},
      year = {2005},
      note = {New York, NY: Spike Gallery}
    }
    
    Keller, D. Drop 2006 Eight-channel tape  misc  
    BibTeX:
    @misc{Keller2006b,
      author = {Keller, D.},
      title = {Drop},
      year = {2006},
      note = {Denton, TX: CEMI}
    }
    
    Keller, D. & Capasso, A. The Trade / La conquista 2000 Installation  misc URL 
    Abstract: Size: 23 Mb.
    BibTeX:
    @misc{Keller2000c,
      author = {Keller, D. and Capasso, A.},
      title = {The Trade / La conquista},
      publisher = {Boulder, CO: CU Art Galleries},
      year = {2000},
      note = {Boulder, CO: CU Art Galleries},
      url = {https://ccrma.stanford.edu/~dkeller/mp3/thetrade.mp3}
    }
    
    Keller, D. & Capasso, A. Vivir sin Después 2004 Installation  misc URL 
    Abstract: Title: Vivir sin después (To live with no afterwards) Video: Ariadna Capasso Sound: Damián Keller Duration: 6’00” Year: 2003-4 Media: Projection, surround sound, sand Vivir sin después is a projection in a space filled with sand. The installation seeks to capture a specific moment in time, a moment of heightened awareness. The senses are alerted by the perception of potential danger. Children are happily at play under a dark sky, pregnant with rain. The storm is imminent. Immersed in the scene, the body tunes to the hypnotic pounding sounds which could be a drum, a beating heart, a falling axe. The changing rhythm makes us teeter between exhilaration and a sense of urgency, fear.

    http://www.perpetualartmachine.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.ShowItem&g2_itemId=4916&g2_GALLERYSID=b8f7e2a87fb2fab68078c25260acc76d

    Size: 31Mb.

    Lecture, CCRMA, Stanford, CA, 2004

    ArteXArte (catalogue), Buenos Aires, Argentina, 2004

    Winds (catalogue), Haim Chanin Fine Arts, New York, NY, 2004

    Funded by Manhattan Community Arts Fund, LMCC, Individual Artist Grant 2003, New York, NY

    Review: Remarks on Vivir sin después, catalogue essay by Robert C. Morgan, 2004

    Artistas encuentran en el viento su fuente de inspiración. Alejandra Villasmil (EFE), El Diario/LaPrensa, New York, January 21, 2004

    Hacen arte con el viento. AlDiaTX.com. January, 23. On-line, 2004. http://www.haimchanin.com/exhibitions/exhibitions_thumb_winds.htm

    Cuatro mujeres intentan capturar el viento en una muestra en Manhattan. Arte. Divino Magazine. Año III, No. 24, February, p. 15, 2004

    BibTeX:
    @misc{Keller2004b,
      author = {Keller, D. and Capasso, A.},
      title = {Vivir sin Después},
      year = {2004},
      note = {New York, NY: Haim Chanin Fine Arts Gallery},
      url = {https://ccrma.stanford.edu/~dkeller/quicktime/vivir.avi}
    }
    
    Keller, D., Capasso, A. & Tinajero, P. Palafito / Home-on-Stilts / Palafita 1.0 [Ubiquitous Music Artwork] 2012 Installation  misc URL 
    BibTeX:
    @misc{Keller2012b,
      author = {Keller, Damián and Ariadna Capasso and Patricia Tinajero},
      title = {Palafito / Home-on-Stilts / Palafita 1.0 [Ubiquitous Music Artwork]},
      year = {2012},
      note = {New York, NY: Floor4Art Studio},
      url = {https://ccrma.stanford.edu/~dkeller/palafito_brochure_floor4art.pdf}
    }
    
    Keller, D. & Carroll, L. Drop 1998 35 mm. Short Film  misc  
    BibTeX:
    @misc{Keller1998b,
      author = {Keller, D. and Luke Carroll},
      title = {Drop},
      year = {1998},
      note = {Vancouver, BC: Kick Start Award}
    }
    
    Keller, D. & Dulcet, S.R. Tijolo com Tijolo 2006 Installation  misc  
    BibTeX:
    @misc{Keller2006c,
      author = {Keller, D. and Sandro Ruggeri Dulcet},
      title = {Tijolo com Tijolo},
      year = {2006},
      note = {Balém, PA: Salão Unama de Pequenos Formatos}
    }
    
    Keller, D. & Knox, U. IQ2 2000 Installation for Video Wall and Activity Recognition System  misc  
    Abstract: Current capitalist society functions on the basis of circulation and accumulation of goods. IQ2 is also shaped after these two processes. The number and behavior of people in the space define the number and characteristics of the events being triggered. Thus, IQ2 could be compared to an organism that reacts to human presence. Because the triggering process is based upon the sensors' change of state, IQ2 is not excited by too many stimuli. In fact, if all sensors are constantly active, no event is triggered. IQ2's ``quiet" state follows an eighty-hour cycle. As long as it is not disturbed, the piece will repeat itself every three days and eight hours.

    The material in IQ2 consists of a few sonic grains and video images. Thus, the local elements of the piece are very static, almost immobile. As it is the case in human social systems, the most relevant structures take place at a higher level. They are determined by relationships among a large number of elements and by processes which unfold very slowly.

    IQ2 takes shape at the junction between time and space. People's behaviors in IQ2's space establish what events occur and how they are distributed through time.

    IQ2 was presented in September 2000 at the Industrial Ear Exhibition, in the Ironworks Gallery, Vancouver, Canada. This work was funded by and realized at the Western Front Artist-Run Center, Vancouver, Canada.

    Review: http://front.nfshost.com/exhibitions/events/2973
    BibTeX:
    @misc{Keller2000e,
      author = {Keller, D. and Una Knox},
      title = {IQ2},
      year = {2000},
      note = {http://front.nfshost.com/exhibitions/events/2973}
    }
    
    Keller, D., Pimenta, M.S., Flores, L.V., Capasso, A. & Tinajero, P. Green Canopy: On The Road [Ubiquitous Music Artwork] 2009 Music Performance  misc URL 
    Abstract: Size: 13Mb.
    Review: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09298215.2011.594514
    BibTeX:
    @misc{Keller2009b,
      author = {Keller, D. and Pimenta, M. S. and Flores, L. V. and Capasso, A. and Tinajero, P},
      title = {Green Canopy: On The Road [Ubiquitous Music Artwork]},
      year = {2009},
      note = {Proceedings of the Brazilian Symposium on Computer Music (XII SBCM)},
      url = {https://ccrma.stanford.edu/~dkeller/mp3/canopy-road.mp3}
    }
    
    Keller, D. & Souza La Patente (Pirandello) 1998 Performance Art  misc  
    BibTeX:
    @misc{Keller1998c,
      author = {Keller, D. and Souza},
      title = {La Patente (Pirandello)},
      year = {1998},
      note = {Burnaby, BC: SFU Black Box Theater}
    }
    
    Keller, D. & Souza, A.L.F. Valsa no. 6 (Nelson Rodrigues) 1999 Performance Art  misc  
    BibTeX:
    @misc{Keller1999c,
      author = {Keller, D. and Souza, A. L. F.},
      title = {Valsa no. 6 (Nelson Rodrigues)},
      year = {1999},
      note = {Burnaby, BC: SFU Theater}
    }
    
    Keller, D. & Souza, A.L.F. Lo femenino en la Pena (Federico García Lorca) 1999 Performance Art  misc  
    BibTeX:
    @misc{Keller1999d,
      author = {Keller, D. and Souza, A. L. F.},
      title = {Lo femenino en la Pena (Federico García Lorca)},
      year = {1999},
      note = {Burnaby, BC: SFU Black Box Theater}
    }
    
    Keller, D., Souza, A.L.F. & Coelho, G.F.C. Dorotéia Masquerade 2001 Performance Art  misc  
    Abstract: The sound material for Dorotéia Masquerade was organized using three sound classes which served as perceptual axes for structuring the piece: vocal sounds, water drops and hybrid metal, water and vocal events. Sonic transformations consisted in temporal and spectral transitions between these classes.

    The combination of a granular control data structure with constrained sonic databases allowed us to synthesize hybrid events, featuring characteristics of different sound classes. The extraction of events from ambient recordings provided a way to relate the sources with their placement in the space. The spatial layout consisted of three separate stereo tracks distributed in the performance space. Outdoor recordings were utilized for open spaces and reverberation by convolution was employed for enclosed spaces.

    During the performance, the sound track consisting of water drops was played continuously, the vocal track established a dialogue with the actress, and the complex events were played at key moments in the piece.

    This work was funded by the Brazilian Student Association of Stanford University. Presented on May 3, 4, and 5, 2001, during the Brazilian Week at the Elliot Center, Stanford University, CA.

    BibTeX:
    @misc{Keller2001g,
      author = {D. Keller and A. L. F. Souza and Guilherme Fernandes Cezar Coelho},
      title = {Dorotéia Masquerade},
      year = {2001}
    }
    
    Keller, D. & Yaluk, K. Instábilis 2001 Installation  misc  
    Abstract: Instábilis proposes a finite sonic space delimited by the resonant characteristics of a single body: a metalic sculpture. As an analogy to the visual objects exposed in the installation (small transparent cubes containing organic materials), the sonic sculpture is explored from different angles creating the timbre space for the piece. The temporal structure - comparable to a kaleidoscope - is random, modular, and constantly varying. Two stereo sources with similar sonic materials reflect the symmetry of the space. As it is the case in environmental sounds, the two soundtracks - with a total duration of twenty minutes - contain no literal repetitions. Given this aleatoric structure, each listener experiences a unique version of the piece.

    During 2001, Instábilis has been presented at Espacio Cultural Citibank, Asunción, Paraguay, and Galeria Athos Vulcão, Brasilia, Brazil.

    BibTeX:
    @misc{Keller2001f,
      author = {Keller, D. and Karina Yaluk},
      title = {Instábilis},
      year = {2001}
    }
    
    Tinajero, P., Capasso, A. & Keller, D. Green Canopy: The Tree 2005 Installation  misc  
    Abstract: Green Canopy: The Tree is articulated as a large architectural object. The 10 foot high, 8 foot wide ‘millenary tree’ is made from scraps, leftovers, and recycled materials, such as PVC pipes and carpet padding. With the process of fabrication we suggest new alternatives to the life-cycle of everyday materials, making us re-examine the value we place on objects (and trash) in a post-industrial society. The plastic forest reminds us that oxygen-producing trees are cut down and replaced by non-biodegradable materials.

    The installation activates the space by using the verticality of the structure to recreate the magical experience of being in the rainforest. The 'trunks' are covered by 'lianas' made from woven plastic bags and VHS tapes. Speakers placed throughout the tree recreate the aural atmosphere of the rainforest. The tree’s textures and sounds make it an attractive and curious object. The electronic equipment runs on solar energy with equipment provided by ETM Solar Works.

    Green Canopy is a collaborative effort between a sculpture/installation artist, Patricia Tinajero; a video-installation artist, Ariadna Capasso; and Damián Keller, a composer specializing in three-dimensional ecological-sounds. Green Canopy was part of the 6th Kingston Sculpture Biennial, Kingston, New York in 2005 and was at Hamilton College for an exhibition commemorating the 30th anniversary of Sculpture Space, in Clinton, New York, in 2006.

    Museum of the Americas, Denver, CO, 2013

    Ewing Gallery, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2007

    LMACK Project Preview, Berlin, Germany, 2006

    Green Canopy, LMACK Project, MACO, México, DF, 2006

    Sculpture Space, Clinton, New York, 2006

    The Nature of Things (catalogue), curated by Karen Shaw, Islip Art Museum, Islip, NY, 2005

    6th Kingston Sculpture Biennial (catalogue), Kingston, New York, 2005

    Review: Jessica Thomas Sep 26 2007, The Daily Beacon:

    “Green Canopy, by artists Ariadna Capasso, Damián Keller and second-year UT faculty member Patricia Tinajero, was inspired by the “fantastic landscape” of the Amazon rainforest. Sight, sound and movement in space all play a role in the experience of this exhibit. Its playful use of perspective pulls viewers between distant and local focal points, and Keller’s score invites them to move through the piece’s rich and subtly layered contrasts of color and texture."

    http://utdailybeacon.com/entertainment/2007/sep/26/art-exhibit-brings-amazon-to-ut/

    Joanna K Miller , Oct 25 2007, Weekly Museum Diary:

    "This exhibition was set up with sculpture style objects in an area of the gallery with abstracted forms up the wall all around the objects. The objects ironically contained no green such would be expected of a exhibition entitled Green Canopy. This appeared to me to be on purpose due to the nature of the work. It gave the feeling that all of the green will be removed if we are not careful with our world."

    http://josmuseums.blogspot.com.br/2007/10/10th-week-ewing-gallery-10-25-07.html

    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09298215.2011.594514

    BibTeX:
    @misc{Tinajero2005,
      author = {Patricia Tinajero and Ariadna Capasso and Keller, D.},
      title = {Green Canopy: The Tree},
      year = {2005},
      note = {http://www.patriciatinajerostudio.com/collaborations/green-canopy}
    }
    
    Tinajero, P., Capasso, A. & Keller, D. Green Canopy: The Forest 2006 Installation  misc  
    Abstract: Green Canopy: The Tree is articulated as a large architectural object. The 10 foot high, 8 foot wide ‘millenary tree’ is made from scraps, leftovers, and recycled materials, such as PVC pipes and carpet padding. With the process of fabrication we suggest new alternatives to the life-cycle of everyday materials, making us re-examine the value we place on objects (and trash) in a post-industrial society. The plastic forest reminds us that oxygen-producing trees are cut down and replaced by non-biodegradable materials.

    The installation activates the space by using the verticality of the structure to recreate the magical experience of being in the rainforest. The 'trunks' are covered by 'lianas' made from woven plastic bags and VHS tapes. Speakers placed throughout the tree recreate the aural atmosphere of the rainforest. The tree’s textures and sounds make it an attractive and curious object. The electronic equipment runs on solar energy with equipment provided by ETM Solar Works.

    Green Canopy is a collaborative effort between a sculpture/installation artist, Patricia Tinajero; a video-installation artist, Ariadna Capasso; and Damián Keller, a composer specializing in three-dimensional ecological-sounds. Green Canopy was part of the 6th Kingston Sculpture Biennial, Kingston, New York in 2005 and was at Hamilton College for an exhibition commemorating the 30th anniversary of Sculpture Space, in Clinton, New York, in 2006.

    Museum of the Americas, Denver, CO, 2013

    Ewing Gallery, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2007

    LMACK Project Preview, Berlin, Germany, 2006

    Green Canopy, LMACK Project, MACO, México, DF, 2006

    Sculpture Space, Clinton, New York, 2006

    The Nature of Things (catalogue), curated by Karen Shaw, Islip Art Museum, Islip, NY, 2005

    6th Kingston Sculpture Biennial (catalogue), Kingston, New York, 2005

    Review: Jessica Thomas Sep 26 2007, The Daily Beacon:

    “Green Canopy, by artists Ariadna Capasso, Damián Keller and second-year UT faculty member Patricia Tinajero, was inspired by the “fantastic landscape” of the Amazon rainforest. Sight, sound and movement in space all play a role in the experience of this exhibit. Its playful use of perspective pulls viewers between distant and local focal points, and Keller’s score invites them to move through the piece’s rich and subtly layered contrasts of color and texture."

    http://utdailybeacon.com/entertainment/2007/sep/26/art-exhibit-brings-amazon-to-ut/

    Joanna K Miller , Oct 25 2007, Weekly Museum Diary:

    "This exhibition was set up with sculpture style objects in an area of the gallery with abstracted forms up the wall all around the objects. The objects ironically contained no green such would be expected of a exhibition entitled Green Canopy. This appeared to me to be on purpose due to the nature of the work. It gave the feeling that all of the green will be removed if we are not careful with our world."

    http://josmuseums.blogspot.com.br/2007/10/10th-week-ewing-gallery-10-25-07.html

    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09298215.2011.594514

    BibTeX:
    @misc{Tinajero2006,
      author = {Patricia Tinajero and Ariadna Capasso and Keller, D.},
      title = {Green Canopy: The Forest},
      year = {2006},
      note = {http://www.patriciatinajerostudio.com/collaborations/green-canopy}
    }
    
    Tinajero, P., Capasso, A. & Keller, D. Green Canopy: The Bud 2006 Installation  misc  
    Abstract: Green Canopy: The Tree is articulated as a large architectural object. The 10 foot high, 8 foot wide ‘millenary tree’ is made from scraps, leftovers, and recycled materials, such as PVC pipes and carpet padding. With the process of fabrication we suggest new alternatives to the life-cycle of everyday materials, making us re-examine the value we place on objects (and trash) in a post-industrial society. The plastic forest reminds us that oxygen-producing trees are cut down and replaced by non-biodegradable materials.

    The installation activates the space by using the verticality of the structure to recreate the magical experience of being in the rainforest. The 'trunks' are covered by 'lianas' made from woven plastic bags and VHS tapes. Speakers placed throughout the tree recreate the aural atmosphere of the rainforest. The tree’s textures and sounds make it an attractive and curious object. The electronic equipment runs on solar energy with equipment provided by ETM Solar Works.

    Green Canopy is a collaborative effort between a sculpture/installation artist, Patricia Tinajero; a video-installation artist, Ariadna Capasso; and Damián Keller, a composer specializing in three-dimensional ecological-sounds. Green Canopy was part of the 6th Kingston Sculpture Biennial, Kingston, New York in 2005 and was at Hamilton College for an exhibition commemorating the 30th anniversary of Sculpture Space, in Clinton, New York, in 2006.

    Museum of the Americas, Denver, CO, 2013

    Ewing Gallery, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2007

    LMACK Project Preview, Berlin, Germany, 2006

    Green Canopy, LMACK Project, MACO, México, DF, 2006

    Sculpture Space, Clinton, New York, 2006

    The Nature of Things (catalogue), curated by Karen Shaw, Islip Art Museum, Islip, NY, 2005

    6th Kingston Sculpture Biennial (catalogue), Kingston, New York, 2005

    Review: Jessica Thomas Sep 26 2007, The Daily Beacon:

    “Green Canopy, by artists Ariadna Capasso, Damián Keller and second-year UT faculty member Patricia Tinajero, was inspired by the “fantastic landscape” of the Amazon rainforest. Sight, sound and movement in space all play a role in the experience of this exhibit. Its playful use of perspective pulls viewers between distant and local focal points, and Keller’s score invites them to move through the piece’s rich and subtly layered contrasts of color and texture."

    http://utdailybeacon.com/entertainment/2007/sep/26/art-exhibit-brings-amazon-to-ut/

    Joanna K Miller , Oct 25 2007, Weekly Museum Diary:

    "This exhibition was set up with sculpture style objects in an area of the gallery with abstracted forms up the wall all around the objects. The objects ironically contained no green such would be expected of a exhibition entitled Green Canopy. This appeared to me to be on purpose due to the nature of the work. It gave the feeling that all of the green will be removed if we are not careful with our world."

    http://josmuseums.blogspot.com.br/2007/10/10th-week-ewing-gallery-10-25-07.html

    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09298215.2011.594514

    BibTeX:
    @misc{Tinajero2006a,
      author = {Patricia Tinajero and Ariadna Capasso and Keller, D.},
      title = {Green Canopy: The Bud},
      year = {2006},
      note = {http://www.patriciatinajerostudio.com/collaborations/green-canopy}
    }
    

    Created by JabRef on 14/12/2012.