Soundwire-fall2007/Bios

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Chris Chafe is a composer/ cellist / music researcher with an interest in computer music composition and interactive performance. He has been a long-term denizen of the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, Stanford University where he directs the center and teaches computer music courses. His doctorate in music composition was completed at Stanford in 1983 with prior degrees in music from the University of California at San Diego and Antioch College. Two yearlong research periods were spent at IRCAM, and the Banff Center for the Arts developing methods for computer sound synthesis based on physical models of musical instrument mechanics. A current project, "SoundWIRE", explores musical collaboration and network evaluation using high-speed internets for high-quality sound.


Ge Wang received his B.S. in 2000 in Computer Science from Duke University, PhD in 2007 (hopefully!) in Computer Science (adviser Perry Cook) from Princeton University, and is currently an assistant professor in the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) at Stanford University. His research interests include real-time software systems for computer music, programming languages, visualization, new performance ensembles (e.g., laptop orchestras) and paradigms (e.g., live coding), interfaces for human-computer interaction, pedagogical methodologies at the intersection of computer science and computer music. Ge is the chief architect of the ChucK audio programming language and the Audicle environment. He is a founding developer and co-director of the Princeton Laptop Orchestra (PLOrk), and a co-creator of the TAPESTREA sound design environment. Ge composes and performs via various electro-acoustic and computer-mediated means.


Composer and guitarist Robert Hamilton (b.1973) is actively engaged in the composition of contemporary electroacoustic musics as well as the development of interactive musical systems for performance and composition. Mr. Hamilton holds degrees from Stanford University, Dartmouth College, and the Peabody Institute of The Johns Hopkins University with additional studies at Le Centre de Création Musicale de Iannis Xenakis (CCMIX) and L'Ecole Normale de Musique de Paris with the EAMA. His compositions and published writings have been presented at the International Computer Music Conference (ICMC 2007, 2006, 2005), newStage:CCRMA Festival, SEAMUS 2007 (Ames), NIME 2006 (Paris), the CCRMA Concert Series, Sound in Media Workshop (Copenhagen), the SPARK Festival, 3rd Practice Festival, ISMIR 2003, the Dartmouth Electric Rainbow Coalition Festival and the Smithsonian Institute. Mr. Hamilton is currently pursuing his Ph.D. in Computer-based Music Theory and Acoustics at Stanford University's CCRMA working with Chris Chafe. His research interests include novel platforms for electroacoustic composition and performance, the definition and implementation of flexible parameter-spaces for interactive musical systems, and systems for real-time musical data-exchange, translation and notation display.


Juan-Pablo Caceres is a composer, performer and engineer born in Santiago, Chile. He is currently a PhD student in computer music at CCRMA in Stanford University (USA). His work includes instrumental and electronic pieces, as well as performance of avantgarde rock music, with a albums edited in Europe and America. Juan-Pablo's interests include Internet music and performance (he is an active member of the SOUNDWire project), virtual acoustic spaces, popular experimental music, boundary pushing computer music (in both directions).

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