Difference between revisions of "HollyJ-250A"

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--d. Duct Tape doing good things: “Our fourth problem was attaching the flex sensors to the glove. We initially had a glove that allowed the flex sensors to move in between slits that we made in the glove. Our observation was that this resulted in readings that were too similar (the value range between straight and bent was too small). Thus, we went down the opposite path and fixed the flex sensors to all parts of the glove using duct tape. This made our glove more stiff, but resulted in better flex sensor readings”
 
--d. Duct Tape doing good things: “Our fourth problem was attaching the flex sensors to the glove. We initially had a glove that allowed the flex sensors to move in between slits that we made in the glove. Our observation was that this resulted in readings that were too similar (the value range between straight and bent was too small). Thus, we went down the opposite path and fixed the flex sensors to all parts of the glove using duct tape. This made our glove more stiff, but resulted in better flex sensor readings”
  
4.  
+
4. Piano gloves – Buttons on end of fingers, but can look to for other design possibilities. http://vimeo.com/7992026
  
  

Revision as of 19:05, 2 November 2014

Music 250A Final Project: Vocal Effects Glove

• Will be targeted toward a specific genre of music (right now, playing with the idea of island reggae/Hawaiian jams.

• Will try to focus on making one glove with good design and functionality, but may make a backup glove as well (not a right and a left, but two lefts).


Sketches

GloveSketch1.png


Examples - Gloves Projects

1. The “DIY Arduino Data Gloves” – from How to Get What You Want http://www.kobakant.at/DIY/?p=4639

--a. Showcases a great design, and a video demonstrates nice functionality (data feedback of hand movement) to control a range of processes.

--b. The Gloves Project page (http://theglovesproject.com/category/diy/) has full the instructions on how this glove is made. Includes materials, tools, pattern, sewing instructions, soldering instructions, … , calibrating, programming, going wired or wireless, and integration with software.

--c. Love the look of these gloves. The bend sensor connection area looks well protected (ends are covered with neoprene squares). The palm is open (no material), so glove does not get hot, I presume. Good design element, since I was considering a skeleton of a glove for this reason. --d. TWO sensors can actually be used for each finger, to register each knuckle bending. I will probably just start with one for each finger and see how the results are.


2. The StretchSense stretch sensors can measure flexible body movement, such as that of the hand, and are equipped with wireless technology. www.stretchsense.com

--a. Demonstration of hand with visualization app at 2:20 in this video: http://youtu.be/7uh0UWPEur4

--b. While a great demonstration, very very expensive sensors for what I will be doing ($850 USD for a starter evaluation kit)

--c. The DESIGN, however, is more along the lines of the skeleton glove I thought about. End segments of each finger can be placed into holders, and glove can stretch over back of hand.


3. Controlling a humanoid hand, which mimic a user’s hand movement in a glove (and which can grasp objects) http://www.contrib.andrew.cmu.edu/~msakmar/

--a. One flex sensor attached to each finger, and one across the palm

--b. Interesting problem to be aware of: “readings from the flex sensors would change dramatically from each use.” Believed to be from…"heat built up during testing and from wearing the glove for extended periods of time…We worked around this problem by calibrating the flex sensors every time we restarted the arduino and robotic hand setup."

--c. "Our second problem, which is partially related to the first, was correctly mapping the analog readings from the flex sensors to the servos. The issue was that the range of the flex sensors was too small; the analog read-in of the arduino has 1024 degrees of resolution, but the flex sensors would only differ from 550 to 750. We accounted for this by using the map function in arduino and by calibrating repeatedly. Calibration consisted of wearing the glove and running the arduino with code that read in and printed out each flex sensor value. We recorded the minimums and maxes of each flex sensor and used those values as input for the map function."

--d. Duct Tape doing good things: “Our fourth problem was attaching the flex sensors to the glove. We initially had a glove that allowed the flex sensors to move in between slits that we made in the glove. Our observation was that this resulted in readings that were too similar (the value range between straight and bent was too small). Thus, we went down the opposite path and fixed the flex sensors to all parts of the glove using duct tape. This made our glove more stiff, but resulted in better flex sensor readings”

4. Piano gloves – Buttons on end of fingers, but can look to for other design possibilities. http://vimeo.com/7992026


5.


Minimal Viable Product - To Do List

Final Deadline - What-I-want-to-get-done List

What-Would-Be-Nice-to-Have List

Materials Needed

Steps to Achieve the Minimal Viable Product

Comments

-Target in on a genre that the effects would gel well with.