Difference between revisions of "Colloquium"

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'''CCRMA Colloquium'''
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@5:30pm in the Classroom on Wednesdays!
  
The CCRMA Colloquium is a weekly gathering of CCRMA students, faculty and staff. It is an opportunity for members of the CCRMA community and guests to share the work that they are doing in the field of Computer Music.  The colloquium typically happens every Wednesday during the school year from 5:15 - 6:30.
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The CCRMA Colloquium is a weekly gathering of CCRMA students, faculty, staff, and guests. It is an opportunity for members of the CCRMA community and invited speakers to share the work that they are doing in the fields of Computer Music, Audio Signal Processing and Music Information Retrieval, Psychoacoustics, and related fields.  The colloquium typically happens every Wednesday during the academic year from 5:30 - 7:00pm and meets in the CCRMA Classroom, Knoll 217, unless otherwise noted.  
  
 +
The colloquium team for 2020-2021 is:<br />
 +
Barbara Nerness - bnerness@ccrma.stanford.edu <br />
 +
Kunwoo Kim - kunwoo@ccrma.stanford.edu <br />
 +
Mike Mulshine - mrmulshine@ccrma.stanford.edu <br />
 +
Camille Noufi - cnoufi@ccrma.stanford.edu <br />
 +
<br />
  
Autumn Quarter Schedule
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*Note: the colloquium will not be held every Wednesday this year (20-21), please keep an eye on the notification e-mails for the dates.
  
'''[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_current Current]''' describes the quantity of electrons passing through a point in a circuit at a given instant in time.
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= Winter Quarter (2021)=
Current is measured in '''[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ampere Amperes]''' ('''Amps''', '''A''').
+
  
'''[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voltage Voltage]''' describes the potential difference in electrical charge between two points in an electrical circuit. '''Voltage''' (also known as '''Electro motive force''' or '''EMF''') is measures in '''[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volt Volts]'''.
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* 1/13: Break
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* '''1/20: Informal Hangout / Dance Party
 +
* '''1/27:
 +
* '''2/03:
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* '''2/10:
 +
*'''2/17: Rapid-Fire Talks''' (5 min) - sign up here via your CCRMA login
 +
** Speaker 1: Kunwoo Kim
 +
** Speaker 2: Elena Georgieva
 +
** Speaker 3: Noah Fram
 +
** Speaker 4: Camille Noufi
 +
** Speaker 5: Barbara Nerness
 +
** Speaker 6:
 +
** Speaker 7:
 +
** Speaker 8:
 +
** Speaker 9:
 +
** Speaker 10:
 +
** Speaker 11:
 +
** Speaker 12:
 +
** Speaker 13:
 +
** Speaker 14:
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** Speaker 15:
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* '''2/24:
 +
* '''3/03: Conference Style Talks''' (15-20 min) - sign up here via your CCRMA login
 +
** Speaker 1:
 +
** Speaker 2:
 +
** Speaker 3:
 +
** Speaker 4:
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* '''3/10: Sasha Leitman
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* '''3/17: Break
  
'''[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_resistance Resistance]''' (a special case of '''[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_impedance Impedance]''') describes the capacity of a circuit element to resist or impede the flow of electrons in the circuit. '''Resistance''' in measure in '''[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohm_%28unit%29 Ohms]'''.
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= Spring Quarter (2021)=
  
A common analogy may be used to relate these three quantities to water flow in pipes in place of electrons in wires. Current is analogous to the quantity of water flowing through a pipe at a given moment in time. Imagine you have two water tanks connected from the bottoms by a pipe (such as the drain of a double sink). If one tank is full of water and the other one empty we know intuitively that the water in the full tank will flow through the pipe into the empty tank until the level of water in the two tanks is equalized. The water in the full tank near the drain pipe is under pressure caused by gravity acting on the water above it in the tank. The difference in pressure between the water at the bottom of the full tank and the bottom of the empty (or only slightly full tank) is analogous to the voltage between poles of a battery (recall that voltage is always measured with respect to two distinct point in a circuit). In the case of a battery there is an excess of electrons present at the negative pole which are attracted to the electron holes at the positive pole with a potential or voltage determined by the chemical and physical properties of the battery.
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Schedule TBD. Dates will be posted here as soon as they are planned.
  
Q: would the voltage change if we increased the amount of water in the full tank? yes - more water means more gravity acting on the water which results in greater pressure at the bottom of the tank.
 
  
Q: What happens if we open the pipe between the two tanks and let water flow? It flows from the full tank to the empty one until the level is the same in both. The same happens if you short the leads of a battery together without a resistor in between.  
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= Past - Autumn Quarter (2020)=
 +
<span style="color:red">'''In person colloquiua will not be held for the 2020 Autumn Quarter. All events will be held remotely.
  
So what governs the time taken to equalize the level in the two tanks? The diameter of the pipe. The larger the pipe the less resistance there is to the water flow (or current) and the faster the levels equalize. Placing a resistor in an electric circuit has the same effect as placing a constriction in a water pipe. The amount of flow (or current) is not fixed, but given the same water pressure (or Voltage) the smaller the constriction the less flow occurs. Increasing the water pressure can counteract the reduction in flow. You can think of a battery as a pair of tanks, one full extra electrons and one empty to which extra electrons are attracted. (does adding constrictions hold in water as for electricity?) .... '''Ohm's Law''' ...
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*'''9/16 New Student Introductions'''
 +
** Speaker 1: Lloyd May
 +
** Speaker 2: Andrew Zhu
 +
** Speaker 3: Kathleen Yuan
 +
** Speaker 4: Marise van Zyl
 +
** Speaker 5: Hannah Choi
 +
** Speaker 6: Joss Saltzman
 +
** Speaker 7: Champ Darabundit
 +
** Speaker 8: Clara Allison
 +
** Speaker 9: David Braun
 +
** Speaker 10: Austin Zambito-Valente
  
==Ohm's Law==
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*'''9/23 Faculty/Staff Introductions'''
 +
**Speaker 1: Jonathan Berger
 +
** Speaker 2: Ge Wang
 +
** Speaker 3: Takako Fujioka
 +
** Speaker 4: Seán O Dalaigh (new DMA)
 +
** Speaker 5: Eleanor Selfridge-Field
 +
** Speaker 6: Craig Stuart Sapp
 +
** Speaker 7: Blair Kaneshiro
  
'''V = IR''' Ohm's Law states that '''Voltage''' = '''Current''' x '''Resistance''' or '''V = IR'''. The equation can be rearranged to find any one of the three quantities given the other two.
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*'''9/30 Faculty/Staff Introductions'''
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** Speaker 1: Patricia Alessandrini (via video)
 +
** Speaker 2: Julius Smith
 +
** Speaker 3: Marina Bosi
 +
** Speaker 4: Nando (aka Fernando Lopez-Lezcano)
 +
** Speaker 5: Stephanie Sherriff
 +
** Speaker 6: Constantin Basica
 +
** Speaker 7: Matt Wright
 +
** Speaker 8: Chris Chafe
  
Consider the following circuit:
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*10/7 - Break
  
<center>
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*'''10/14 - Town Hall'''
[[Image:Ohms_law_1.png]]
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</center>
+
  
The voltage in the circuit is given (10V from the battery) and the resistance is also given as the 100 ohm resistor is the only resistive element in the circuit. So we can compute the current in the circuit as: I = V/R = 10V / 100 Ohms = 0.1 Amps or 100 milli-Amps.
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*'''10/21 - Adjunct Faculty Talks'''
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** Speaker 1: Malcolm Slaney
 +
** Speaker 2: Poppy Crum
 +
** Speaker 3: Paul Demarinis
 +
** Speaker 4: Jonathan Abel
 +
** Speaker 5: Doug James
  
==Button LED Example==
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*11/4 - Break
  
The following circuit diagram show the most basic LED (Light Emitting Diode) circuit:
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*'''11/11 - [https://www.justinsalamon.com/ Justin Salamon (Adobe / NYU)] [https://vimeo.com/480670893 (Watch Again)]'''
  
<center>
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*'''11/18 - Mona Shahnavaz'''
[[Image:led.png]]
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</center>
+
  
Diodes are from the family of semiconductors. Unlike a resistors, diodes always have a fixed voltage drop in a circuit. A diode passes current in only one direction, a very useful property for protecting circuits from incorrect current flow. The arrow in the diode symbol points in the direction that current flows, so normally you would place a diode in your circuit with the arrow pointing to a ground. Therefore once we know the current passing through the resistor in this circuit we also know the current passing through the LED. The brightness of an LED is proportional to the amount of current passing through it. How would you make the LED shine brighter? less brightly?
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ABSTRACT & BIO:
 +
Mona is an enthusiastic musician, whose focus and passion has been to
 +
share the joy of music with others. In 2018, a successful outcome of
 +
her innovative music program designed for senior citizens was the
 +
turning point for her to decide to change the course of learning piano
 +
in a less complex route. Her engineering background helped her to
 +
start working on the idea that bridges the gap between music and
 +
technology.
  
Now consider the following circuit which adds a button:
+
The approach to fingering in music has always been and still is one of
 +
the major elements of success for keyboard players. Correct fingering
 +
assists the performer in delivering a better technical and musical
 +
performance. This research presents the best technique to generate
 +
fingering for any sequence of music notes. Dynamic programming and
 +
mathematics are major parts of this paper, they work alongside rules
 +
set by pianists to calculate the most practical fingerings for any
 +
musical passage.
  
<center>
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The ultimate goal is to facilitate the process of playing the piano
[[Image:button_led.png]]
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using an AR platform. This is helpful for scaling music instructors
</center>
+
and allows for efficient teaching. Through solving this problem,
 +
virtual instructions would be more productive and impactful. Success
 +
of this research applied in the AR field can be applied to robotic
 +
tasks in educational programs, video games, and medical fields.
  
The button simply interrupts or re-connects the flow of current through the circuit lighting or extinguishing the LED in the process.
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*11/25 - THANKSGIVING WEEK - Break
 
+
<center>
+
[[PID 2007]]
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</center>
+
 
+
 
+
[[Category:PID]][[Category:PID_2007]]
+

Revision as of 11:20, 20 January 2021

@5:30pm in the Classroom on Wednesdays!

The CCRMA Colloquium is a weekly gathering of CCRMA students, faculty, staff, and guests. It is an opportunity for members of the CCRMA community and invited speakers to share the work that they are doing in the fields of Computer Music, Audio Signal Processing and Music Information Retrieval, Psychoacoustics, and related fields. The colloquium typically happens every Wednesday during the academic year from 5:30 - 7:00pm and meets in the CCRMA Classroom, Knoll 217, unless otherwise noted.

The colloquium team for 2020-2021 is:
Barbara Nerness - bnerness@ccrma.stanford.edu
Kunwoo Kim - kunwoo@ccrma.stanford.edu
Mike Mulshine - mrmulshine@ccrma.stanford.edu
Camille Noufi - cnoufi@ccrma.stanford.edu

  • Note: the colloquium will not be held every Wednesday this year (20-21), please keep an eye on the notification e-mails for the dates.

Winter Quarter (2021)

  • 1/13: Break
  • 1/20: Informal Hangout / Dance Party
  • 1/27:
  • 2/03:
  • 2/10:
  • 2/17: Rapid-Fire Talks (5 min) - sign up here via your CCRMA login
    • Speaker 1: Kunwoo Kim
    • Speaker 2: Elena Georgieva
    • Speaker 3: Noah Fram
    • Speaker 4: Camille Noufi
    • Speaker 5: Barbara Nerness
    • Speaker 6:
    • Speaker 7:
    • Speaker 8:
    • Speaker 9:
    • Speaker 10:
    • Speaker 11:
    • Speaker 12:
    • Speaker 13:
    • Speaker 14:
    • Speaker 15:
  • 2/24:
  • 3/03: Conference Style Talks (15-20 min) - sign up here via your CCRMA login
    • Speaker 1:
    • Speaker 2:
    • Speaker 3:
    • Speaker 4:
  • 3/10: Sasha Leitman
  • 3/17: Break

Spring Quarter (2021)

Schedule TBD. Dates will be posted here as soon as they are planned.


Past - Autumn Quarter (2020)

In person colloquiua will not be held for the 2020 Autumn Quarter. All events will be held remotely.

  • 9/16 New Student Introductions
    • Speaker 1: Lloyd May
    • Speaker 2: Andrew Zhu
    • Speaker 3: Kathleen Yuan
    • Speaker 4: Marise van Zyl
    • Speaker 5: Hannah Choi
    • Speaker 6: Joss Saltzman
    • Speaker 7: Champ Darabundit
    • Speaker 8: Clara Allison
    • Speaker 9: David Braun
    • Speaker 10: Austin Zambito-Valente
  • 9/23 Faculty/Staff Introductions
    • Speaker 1: Jonathan Berger
    • Speaker 2: Ge Wang
    • Speaker 3: Takako Fujioka
    • Speaker 4: Seán O Dalaigh (new DMA)
    • Speaker 5: Eleanor Selfridge-Field
    • Speaker 6: Craig Stuart Sapp
    • Speaker 7: Blair Kaneshiro
  • 9/30 Faculty/Staff Introductions
    • Speaker 1: Patricia Alessandrini (via video)
    • Speaker 2: Julius Smith
    • Speaker 3: Marina Bosi
    • Speaker 4: Nando (aka Fernando Lopez-Lezcano)
    • Speaker 5: Stephanie Sherriff
    • Speaker 6: Constantin Basica
    • Speaker 7: Matt Wright
    • Speaker 8: Chris Chafe
  • 10/7 - Break
  • 10/14 - Town Hall
  • 10/21 - Adjunct Faculty Talks
    • Speaker 1: Malcolm Slaney
    • Speaker 2: Poppy Crum
    • Speaker 3: Paul Demarinis
    • Speaker 4: Jonathan Abel
    • Speaker 5: Doug James
  • 11/4 - Break
  • 11/18 - Mona Shahnavaz

ABSTRACT & BIO: Mona is an enthusiastic musician, whose focus and passion has been to share the joy of music with others. In 2018, a successful outcome of her innovative music program designed for senior citizens was the turning point for her to decide to change the course of learning piano in a less complex route. Her engineering background helped her to start working on the idea that bridges the gap between music and technology.

The approach to fingering in music has always been and still is one of the major elements of success for keyboard players. Correct fingering assists the performer in delivering a better technical and musical performance. This research presents the best technique to generate fingering for any sequence of music notes. Dynamic programming and mathematics are major parts of this paper, they work alongside rules set by pianists to calculate the most practical fingerings for any musical passage.

The ultimate goal is to facilitate the process of playing the piano using an AR platform. This is helpful for scaling music instructors and allows for efficient teaching. Through solving this problem, virtual instructions would be more productive and impactful. Success of this research applied in the AR field can be applied to robotic tasks in educational programs, video games, and medical fields.

  • 11/25 - THANKSGIVING WEEK - Break