Difference between revisions of "250A FirstIdeas 2013"

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<br>Musical siren construction is covered in the aerophones chapter of the book Musical Instrument Design by Bart Hopkin (one of many, many topics covered in the book). In addition, more extensive information on sirens appeared in two articles appearing in the Experimental Musical Instruments quarterly journal. The first, in Volume 12 #4 (June 1997) covered the history of sirens, with explanations of basic principles and lots of wonderful historic engravings of early instruments. The second, in Volume 13 #1 (Sept 1997) had information on musical siren construction.
 
<br>Musical siren construction is covered in the aerophones chapter of the book Musical Instrument Design by Bart Hopkin (one of many, many topics covered in the book). In addition, more extensive information on sirens appeared in two articles appearing in the Experimental Musical Instruments quarterly journal. The first, in Volume 12 #4 (June 1997) covered the history of sirens, with explanations of basic principles and lots of wonderful historic engravings of early instruments. The second, in Volume 13 #1 (Sept 1997) had information on musical siren construction.
 
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<br>We should find the <i>Experimental Musical Instruments</i> journal vol. 12 #4 June 1997 and vol. 13 #1: September 1997 “Sirens: Pt. 2″: Bart Hopkin. 3+ pages; 2 photos.
 +
In the second part of a two part series, the author describes a pair of simple musical sirens he made with the idea of passing on some of the practical design and construction information picked up along the way. Includes a scale making chart [additional keywords: electric motor].
  
  

Revision as of 13:57, 24 October 2013

Parameters of Musical Instrument/Controller Design

Teaches you something

Jammability/Plays well with others

Coolness for Musician/Garners Attention

Sense of Humor/Surprise

Dance while playing

unique sound

does something the human body can't do

souvenier

awareness augmentuation

Ritual

Ritual/Play

Community

Learnability/Hope

Looks - allignment with purpose

Appropriate resonator

Tactile feel and quality

Tactile feedback for precision

Gesture influenced timbre and dynamics

Precision of notes

Extendability and flexibility

Durability

Ease of Use

Fun

Availability

Context in Daily Life

Rock and Roll

Expressivity

Sense of Wonder

Pressure Sensitivity

Dynamic Range

Musical Range

Good Sensors

Value

Robustness

Control

Affordability

Portability

Modularity

Personalization



Danger Zones

Technology Failure

Moving parts

Temperature/light humidity, noise, electronic field instability

Long metal or long cables

Physics

Feature Creep

One-off parts

Overextension of:

computer power

time

$

skills


==Minimum Viable Product

Need

Want

Nice to have

Alon Devorah

Andrew Forsyth

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vocoder



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Brandon Cheung

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I found 2 sort of related papers.

First is a Frequency content of Breath Pressure -- http://www.nime.org/proceedings/2005/nime2005_093.pdf

And then, another project which doesn't use a mask, but does visual based visualization of breathing -- http://www.nime.org/proceedings/2009/nime2009_153.pdf


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Brie Bunge

Cooper Newby

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And water? Visually, I couldn't find the Rain Writer piece you mentioned, but the MOMA has the rain room http://www.moma.org/visit/calendar/exhibitions/1380

This NIME paper http://www.nime.org/proceedings/2001/nime2001_034.pdf also has a section (the middle one) about water as a sound controller.


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IMG 2014.jpg

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Research/Comments: Space Mouse Driver




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Dan Somen

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Cruise Control is an app that tracks a runner's cadence and plays music with a matching tempo.

http://www.gizmag.com/cruise-control-running-music-app/25715/

http://www.cruisecontrolrun.com/



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Imogen Heap's musical suit

http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2012-10/29/imogen-heap

Materials Spandex BodySuit http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007AISF7K/ref=s9_simh_gw_p193_d0_i1?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_r=116JA0MF0NSRV4JJGM4B&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=1630072222&pf_rd_i=507846

Accelerometers

Flex Sensors

Force Sensors


I like the gestural ability and freedom provided by the suit, but I fear that there will not be much precision. I'd like to incorporate some repeatable precise controls with nice tactile feedback.


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Jump Start Musical Trampoline for kids: http://www.amazon.com/Jump-Smart-Trampoline-Music-Games/dp/B000ETRFRS

In use: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8TFqox8txtI

David Bordow

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David Grunzweig

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Elliot Kermit-Canfield

Emily Graber

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Erich Peske

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Gabriele Carotti-Sha

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Gina Collecchia

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Kevin says:
San Francisco replaced their old emergency siren system in 2004. Perhaps we could score one from their stockpile.
http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/SAN-FRANCISCO-It-s-kaput-for-those-old-air-raid-2637073.php

Some nice old sirens on ebay. None local.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/VINTAGE-SIREN-HORN-Air-RAID-EMERGENCY-SECURITY-/190937924229 (New York)
http://www.ebay.com/itm/WWII-Vintage-Air-Raid-Tornado-siren-/141095996476 (Iowa)

Light sirens available locally:
http://sfbay.craigslist.org/pen/atq/4113810872.html
http://sfbay.craigslist.org/eby/atd/4086472669.html

Oakland victory siren on a boat
http://oaklandvictorysiren.com/movies/victory_siren_on_the_white_holly.php#more

Musical Siren (from Sasha)
http://windworld.com/features/gallery/musical-siren-built-by-bart-hopkin/
Musical siren construction is covered in the aerophones chapter of the book Musical Instrument Design by Bart Hopkin (one of many, many topics covered in the book). In addition, more extensive information on sirens appeared in two articles appearing in the Experimental Musical Instruments quarterly journal. The first, in Volume 12 #4 (June 1997) covered the history of sirens, with explanations of basic principles and lots of wonderful historic engravings of early instruments. The second, in Volume 13 #1 (Sept 1997) had information on musical siren construction.

We should find the Experimental Musical Instruments journal vol. 12 #4 June 1997 and vol. 13 #1: September 1997 “Sirens: Pt. 2″: Bart Hopkin. 3+ pages; 2 photos. In the second part of a two part series, the author describes a pair of simple musical sirens he made with the idea of passing on some of the practical design and construction information picked up along the way. Includes a scale making chart [additional keywords: electric motor].




Justin Li

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Kevin McElroy

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Research/Comments: Orchestra d'Mastication




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Research/Comments: Baby Farts!




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Research/Comments: Guts




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Research/Comments: Sleep: The Musical Instrument
http://www.sleep-tests.co.uk/polysomnography.php
The PSG or polysomnogram, as the test is referred to, measures or monitors many body functions including the eye movements (EOG), brain (EEG), heart rhythm (ECG), skeletal muscle activation (EMG), and breathing or respiratory effort during sleep
Usually at least 11 channels (wires) to the patient's head, takes 1-2 hours to set up.
Of the eleven channels, two are for EEG - to determine if the person is indeed sleeping and in what stage of sleep he/she is at a given time - one channel to measure air flow, one channel each to sense chin and leg movements, two channels to measure REM, one channel each for EKG and oxygen saturation, and one for recording the chest and abdominal wall movements. All these channels are then wired to a computer where it is deciphered into readable attributes and stored for future reference or record. A live video of the sleeping patient is also recorded so that the supervising technician could observe the patient from an adjacent room. The same clips may also be used by the doctor for further diagnosis of the patient. Despite all the wires attached to the patient, interestingly, it has been found that few patients ever have any problems sleeping whilst under observation. Most of them stated they even slept better in the lab than at home.




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Research/Comments: Dope Soapy Beats




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Research/Comments: Beat Box




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Research/Comments: S.A.L.T.
Andy Goldsworthy




Kunal Datta

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Micah Arvey

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Michael Mendoza

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Pablo Castellanos Macin

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Research/Comments: Flood detector



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Research/Comments: Thermochromic paint pee

Robert Shin

Rooney Pitchford

Sophia Westwood

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ConductiveKaleidoscopeSophiaWestwood.jpg

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MusicalKitchenKnifeJuicerSophiaWestwood.jpg

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ShadowMusicSophiaWestwood.jpg

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TwitterInstrumentSophiaWestwood.jpg

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Zach Saraf

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