Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics

Summer Workshops 2015 Announced!

2015 Summer Workshop lineup announced! Check https://ccrma.stanford.edu/workshops for details. Register http://app.certain.com/profile/form/index.cfm?PKformID=0x1979858dec1.

Upcoming Events

Learning and Plasticity for Auditory Perception

Date: 
Wed, 06/03/2015 - 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Seminar Room
Event Type: 
Hearing Seminar
How do we adapt to the world around us? Adaptation is common for all of us, but especially important for patients that get cochlear implants. Many grew up hearing normally, but due to trauma have to make do with a wires that electrically stimulate the hair cells of the cochlea. This a very primitive approach that yields impressive result. But the resulting perceptions are nothing like what the patient is used to hearing.

How is it that the brain learns how to process new stimuli? And what can we do to make it easier for an individual? Dr. Matt Fitzgerald is a new member of the Stanford community. I’m happy to learn more about his work and to welcome him to the Stanford Hearing Community.
FREE
Open to the Public

Henry Kaiser + William Winant + Tania Chen

Date: 
Thu, 06/04/2015 - 7:30pm - 9:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA STAGE
Event Type: 
Concert

FREE
Open to the Public

Computational modeling of early language acquisition – Bridging the gap between acoustic input and high-level linguistic representations

Date: 
Fri, 06/19/2015 - 11:00am - 12:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA Seminar Room
Event Type: 
Hearing Seminar
It is amazing that all of us as infants learn how to parse the auditory environment around us. Okko Räsänen is here at Stanford as a PostDoc, and coming to CCRMA to talk about his work on understanding how infants learn to segment words out of the acoustic stream. This is a special post-quarter seminar, and I think the topic is important to anybody that thinks about high-level understanding of sound.

Who: Okko Räsänen (Stanford and Aalto University)
What: Computational modeling of early language acquisition
          Bridging the gap between acoustic input and high-level linguistic representations
When: 11AM on Friday June 19, 2015
Where: CCRMA Seminar Room
FREE
Open to the Public
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Recent Events

Gabriella Musacchia on Brain Plasticity with Music and Auditory Enrichment

Date: 
Fri, 04/24/2015 - 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Location: 
TBD: CCRMA Seminar Room or the classroom
Event Type: 
Hearing Seminar
Brain plasticity with music and auditory enrichment: Implications for early music education. Note special time!!!!! 3PM Seminar!!!
FREE
Open to the Public

Waxy Tomb - [Julia Litman-Cleper]

Date: 
Thu, 04/23/2015 - 7:30pm - 9:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA STAGE
Event Type: 
Concert
Please join us for a live electronics and video set with WaxyTomb [aka Julia Litman-Cleper]
FREE
Open to the Public

Recent progress in efficient physics-based synthesis of string instrument sound

Date: 
Thu, 04/23/2015 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom [Knoll 217]
Event Type: 
DSP Seminar

ABSTRACT

Applications combining digital waveguides, modal synthesis, and finite-difference time-domain modeling will be presented in the context of efficient simulation of string instruments.

The first part of this talk will introduce a technique for modeling bridge admittances and body radiativity profiles from frequency response measurements on guitars and bowed string instruments. The formulation, relying on modal analysis, is then used to construct reflectance and radiativity models enabling efficient simulation of string plucks via digital waveguides.
FREE
Open to the Public

Guest Lecture: Julia Litman-Cleper. Sound Mappings: Inhabiting virtual geometry through sound.

Date: 
Thu, 04/23/2015 - 5:15pm - 6:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Stage
Event Type: 
Guest Lecture
The experience of hearing one’s own voice “from the outside,” usually through an electronic device, is often at first described as “weird” or “strange” and jarring. This talk will discuss the role of internal sound and self-referent external sound in relation to proprioceptive processes, or the sense of oneself in physical space.  Sound compositions may have the capacity to change proprioceptive mappings through inducing otherwise unknowable quasi-spatial experience. We will speculate on possible reasons why it may be so. How is it that certain kinds of sound patterns can cause a deviation from what is otherwise normalized expectations of events in time.
FREE
Open to the Public
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Recent News

This is Your Brain on Opera

New York Times article: Jonathan Berger's "Visitations" Premiére at Stanford.
PALO ALTO, Calif. — I attended two performances of Jonathan Berger’s “Visitations” at the Bing Concert Hall at Stanford last week here. On Friday evening I sat in the primary motor cortex. The following night, my seat was located off to the side, in Broca’s area.
“Visitations,” a double bill of one-act operas about auditory hallucinations, mixes digital sounds with live voices and a chamber ensemble.

Sound Makers Unite at Stanford

From the Make Blog: This weekend I went down to Palo Alto to check out the DIY Musical Instrument Tailgate Party, hosted by Thingamajigs and the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA).

The fun, welcoming event was an amplified (pun intended) meetup, where makers could show off their projects and prototypes to each other. The public was invited to interact with the makers and the instruments and there were several performances throughout the afternoon as well. Read more here...

More than a Stanford concert hall, Bing is a high-tech music research lab

Like a well-designed sports car, Stanford's new Bing Concert Hall looks great from the outside but is even more impressive when you peer under the hood. And Feb. 15-16, Bing's high-tech engine will shift into overdrive when the groundbreaking electronic musicians of Stanford's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) showcase their latest works. Read more...

(Stanford News article by Nate Sloan)

CCRMA's Ge Wang Named Champion of the Arts

Stanford faculty member Ge Wang is the recipient of this year's "Champion of the Arts" Award. Ge Wang of Stanford's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) and co-founder of Smule, will add this new title to the many awards and accolades he has already received for his innovative work in music through technology. 

Musical America: "All Hail, Bing"

Bay Area music lovers converged on Stanford University over the weekend, as the long-awaited Bing Concert Hall opened its doors. Read more...
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