Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics

Summer Workshops 2015 Announced!

2015 Summer Workshop lineup announced! Check https://ccrma.stanford.edu/workshops for details. Register http://app.certain.com/profile/form/index.cfm?PKformID=0x1979858dec1.

Upcoming Events

Don Knuth: Constraint-based composition

Date: 
Thu, 05/07/2015 - 5:15pm - 6:15pm
Location: 
CCRMA Stage
Event Type: 
Guest Lecture
Don Knuth will come and discuss/explain the peculiar(?) methods that he is using as he tries to compose a major work for pipe organ.
Biography
FREE
Open to the Public

Bruno Ruviaro: Cinema For The Ears

Date: 
Fri, 05/08/2015 - 7:30pm - 9:00pm
Location: 
Braun Rehearsal Hall
Event Type: 
Concert
A movie without images: what does that look like? Or should we say, how does it sound? In this immersive surround-sound concert, Brazilian composer Bruno Ruviaro becomes the DJ to guide you through a full evening dedicated to your ears. But is it music or cinema? With this unusual, genre-defying combination of dialogue, sound, music, and ambiance, let your imagination boldly go where it has never gone before!

Bruno will use CCRMA's 25.6 3D system currently set up at Braun Rehearsal Hall in the Braun Music Center to dazzel your mind/ears.

Directions: music.stanford.edu/venues/campbell/directions-parking



FREE
Open to the Public

Troy Rogers - The MEARIS Concept: Making Music with Modular Electro-Acoustic Robotic Instrument Systems

Date: 
Thu, 05/14/2015 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Stage
Event Type: 
Guest Lecture
In this presentation, Rogers will discuss various aspects of his creative work with musical robots and other devices, with a focus on hybrid robotic instrument systems in which the robotic aspect can function as an automatically tunable acoustic filter as well as acoustic sound source, a scenario which gives rise to increased parametric depth and expressive potential.

FREE
Open to the Public
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Recent Events

Robert Henke shares his favorite sound design tricks with Ableton Live and Max4Live

Date: 
Sat, 04/04/2015 - 10:00am - 4:00pm
Location: 
Knoll Stage, Stanford University Campus
Event Type: 
Guest Lecture

A software as complex as Ableton Live offers many ways to manipulate sound. Some are obvious and some are hidden. Robert Henke shows some examples of creative work with the software, and provides insight into more complex and iterative processes involved in his work flow. The workshop will also deal with questions of sound quality, the idea of 'good sound' and how to achieve this in a real world situation during a performance. In the second part of the workshop Robert Henke will dive into some of his Max4Live devices and will discuss the reasoning for developing own patches or tools. When does it help the creative process and when does it become a distraction?

FREE
Open to the Public

Robert Henke: Finding a New Audiovisual Language Using Lasers and Sound

Date: 
Wed, 04/01/2015 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
Knoll Stage
Event Type: 
Colloquium
Robert Henke talks about his laser based performance project Lumière II which just premiered at Centre George Pompidou in Paris, and provides insight into the artistic and technical challenges of the project.

Artist Bio:

Robert Henke, born 1969 in Munich, Germany, builds and operates machines that create sounds, shapes and structures.
FREE
Open to the Public

Robert Henke Symposium Spring 2015

Date: 
Tue, 03/31/2015 - 6:00pm - Thu, 04/09/2015 - 9:00pm
Location: 
Knoll Stage
Event Type: 
Guest Lecture

Symposium Title:  A totally subjective knowledge dump about sound, performance, reverb, the beauty of repetition and the never ending battle against technology and a lack of inspiration.

FREE
For CCRMA Users Only

Michael Mandel on Auditory bubbles: Estimating time frequency importance functions

Date: 
Fri, 03/20/2015 - 11:00am - 12:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA Seminar Room
Event Type: 
Hearing Seminar
Listeners can reliably identify speech in noisy conditions, but it is not well understood which specific features of the speech they use to do this.  This talk presents a data-driven framework for identifying these features.  By analyzing listening-test results involving the same speech utterance mixed with many different "bubble" noise instances, the framework is able to compute the importance of each time-frequency point in the utterance to its intelligibility, which we call the time-frequency importance function.  These results can be seen as a quantification of a listener's strategy for understanding a 
FREE
Open to the Public
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Recent News

This is Your Brain on Opera

New York Times article: Jonathan Berger's "Visitations" Premiére at Stanford.
PALO ALTO, Calif. — I attended two performances of Jonathan Berger’s “Visitations” at the Bing Concert Hall at Stanford last week here. On Friday evening I sat in the primary motor cortex. The following night, my seat was located off to the side, in Broca’s area.
“Visitations,” a double bill of one-act operas about auditory hallucinations, mixes digital sounds with live voices and a chamber ensemble.

Sound Makers Unite at Stanford

From the Make Blog: This weekend I went down to Palo Alto to check out the DIY Musical Instrument Tailgate Party, hosted by Thingamajigs and the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA).

The fun, welcoming event was an amplified (pun intended) meetup, where makers could show off their projects and prototypes to each other. The public was invited to interact with the makers and the instruments and there were several performances throughout the afternoon as well. Read more here...

More than a Stanford concert hall, Bing is a high-tech music research lab

Like a well-designed sports car, Stanford's new Bing Concert Hall looks great from the outside but is even more impressive when you peer under the hood. And Feb. 15-16, Bing's high-tech engine will shift into overdrive when the groundbreaking electronic musicians of Stanford's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) showcase their latest works. Read more...

(Stanford News article by Nate Sloan)

CCRMA's Ge Wang Named Champion of the Arts

Stanford faculty member Ge Wang is the recipient of this year's "Champion of the Arts" Award. Ge Wang of Stanford's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) and co-founder of Smule, will add this new title to the many awards and accolades he has already received for his innovative work in music through technology. 

Musical America: "All Hail, Bing"

Bay Area music lovers converged on Stanford University over the weekend, as the long-awaited Bing Concert Hall opened its doors. Read more...
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