Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics

Summer Workshops 2015 Announced!

2015 Summer Workshop lineup announced! Check https://ccrma.stanford.edu/workshops for details. Register http://app.certain.com/profile/form/index.cfm?PKformID=0x1979858dec1.

Hans Tutschku @ CCRMA: 4/6 ... 4/10 2015

04/08: Colloquium, Listening Room: Connection of Gesture and Space
04/10: Concert, Braun Rehearsal Hall: Electroacoustic Works (with a full deployment of our 3D speaker array)
Music 222 master classes.

Upcoming Events

Robert Henke shares his favorite sound design tricks with Ableton Live and Max4Live

Date: 
Sat, 04/04/2015 - 10:00am - 4:00pm
Location: 
Knoll Stage, Stanford University Campus
Event Type: 
Guest Lecture

A software as complex as Ableton Live offers many ways to manipulate sound. Some are obvious and some are hidden. Robert Henke shows some examples of creative work with the software, and provides insight into more complex and iterative processes involved in his work flow. The workshop will also deal with questions of sound quality, the idea of 'good sound' and how to achieve this in a real world situation during a performance. In the second part of the workshop Robert Henke will dive into some of his Max4Live devices and will discuss the reasoning for developing own patches or tools. When does it help the creative process and when does it become a distraction?

FREE
Open to the Public

Xavier Serra - Music Information Retrieval from a Multicultural Perspective

Date: 
Mon, 04/06/2015 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom
Event Type: 
Guest Colloquium
Music is a universal phenomenon that manifests itself in every cultural context with a particular personality and the technologies supporting music have to take into account the specificities that every musical culture might have. This is particularly evident in the field of Music Information Retrieval, in which we aim at developing technologies to analyse, describe and explore any type of music. From this perspective we started the project CompMusic (http://compmusic.upf.edu) in which we focus on a number of MIR problems through the study of five music cultures: Hindustani (North India), Carnatic (South India), Turkish-makam (Turkey), Arab-Andalusian (Maghreb), and Beijing Opera (China).
FREE
Open to the Public

Hans Tutschku: Connection of Gesture and Space

Date: 
Wed, 04/08/2015 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
Listening Room
Event Type: 
Guest Colloquium

The physical gesture of instrumentalists and dancers has been of great interest to me over the past 25 years. My musical education on the piano and later with live-electronics taught me aspects of music-making long before I thought to compose. Any music I have written, be it for instruments, singers or electronic sources, is searching for the expression of gestural phrasing, relationships between cause and effect (and their negation) and a plausibility carried over from our experiences outside of music.

Open to the Public
Syndicate content

Recent Events

An interactive interface for predominant pitch extraction, and its applications in singing evaluation, source separation and cover-version generation.

Date: 
Tue, 01/27/2015 - 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA Seminar Room [Knoll 315]
Event Type: 
DSP Seminar

Dr. Vishweshwara Rao, 
SensiBol Audio Technologies 

FREE
Open to the Public

SETI Institute AIR Program / Stanford CCRMA / Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics

Date: 
Wed, 01/21/2015 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Location: 
189 Bernardo Ave, Suite 100, Mountain View, CA 94043
Event Type: 
Colloquium
 January 21, 2015 6-8 pm
 
The SETI Institute invites CCRMA faculty, students and alumni to a keynote presentation by SETI’s artists in residence. Please join Chris Chafe, Nette Worthey, SETI scientists Jill Tarter and Nathalie Cabrol, incoming AIRs Nina Waisman and Martin Wilner, NASA historian Glenn Bugos and friends for this informal gathering.
Open to the Public

SETI Institute AIR Program

Date: 
Wed, 01/21/2015 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Location: 
SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Ave., Ste. 100, Mountain View
Event Type: 
Colloquium

SETI Institute AIR Program / Stanford CCRMA / Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics

January 21, 2015 6-8 pm

The SETI Institute invites CCRMA faculty, students and alumni to a keynote presentation by SETI’s artists in residence. Please join Chris Chafe, Nette Worthey, SETI scientists Jill Tarter and Nathalie Cabrol, incoming AIRs Nina Waisman and Martin Wilner, NASA historian Glenn Bugos and friends for this informal gathering. Other attendees to be announced.
Open to the Public

Thomas Ankersmit

Date: 
Mon, 01/19/2015 - 7:30pm - 9:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA STAGE
Event Type: 
Concert
Thomas Ankersmit is a musician and installation artist based in Berlin and Amsterdam. Following his colloquium he will present a concert of his recent works. Since 2006 his main instrument, both live and in the studio, has been the Serge analogue modular synthesizer. Acoustic phenomena such as sound reflections, infrasonic vibration, otoacoustic emissions, and highly directional projections of sound have been an important part of his work since the early 2000's.
FREE
Open to the Public
Syndicate content

Recent News

CCRMA's Ge Wang Named Champion of the Arts

Stanford faculty member Ge Wang is the recipient of this year's "Champion of the Arts" Award. Ge Wang of Stanford's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) and co-founder of Smule, will add this new title to the many awards and accolades he has already received for his innovative work in music through technology. 

Musical America: "All Hail, Bing"

Bay Area music lovers converged on Stanford University over the weekend, as the long-awaited Bing Concert Hall opened its doors. Read more...

CCRMA's Work at Bing Concert Hall Featured in Stanford Daily

 Stanford's Bing Concert Hall opens this Friday with soundscape fanfare: The first notes on opening night will show off the advanced acoustic and technical systems of the new concert hall. Read more...

Holly Herndon featured on NPR First Listen

Holly Herndon renders 1s and 0s in ways that feel as personal and internal as heartbeats, and makes her laptop's sounds fit as comfortably as a second skin.

CNN.com article highlighting Wendy Ju's work: Bridging the gap between humans and computers

 Computers are evolving. We have voice-controlled assistants on our phones, telepresence robots for when we can't make it to a meeting in person, and self-driving cars that are headed to a road near you.

These machines aren't just taking over human tasks. Computerized systems are also taking on more human characteristics. As technology gets more advanced, how will our relationships with it change? Read more...
Syndicate content