Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics

CCRMA Summer Workshops 2014

CCRMA Summer Workshops have been scheduled for 2014. Full schedule, links to detailed sites, and registration information can be found by clicking here. Come join us at CCRMA this summer!

Upcoming Events

There are no events currently scheduled. Please check again soon.
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Recent Events

Percy Liang: Piano Recital

Date: 
Sat, 04/26/2014 - 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Stage
Event Type: 
Concert
CCRMA is proud to present an afternoon of classical piano music by Scarlatti, Beethoven, Chopin, and Scriabin performed by assistant professor of computer science, Percy Liang.

Program:
FREE
Open to the Public

François Germain: Towards practical source-independent algorithms using nonnegative matrix factorization

Date: 
Wed, 04/23/2014 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom, The Knoll 2nd floor, Rm 217
Event Type: 
Colloquium
Limitations of nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) were recently circumvented through the development of "universal source models" which exploit the similarities inside a given class of sources in order to eliminate the need for user-provided training data. The resulting system is unsupervised from the user perspective which strongly improves its range of practical use. This method was applied to applications such as offline speech enhancement, voice activity detection and singing voice separation. 

Full abstract:
Open to the Public

JACK QUARTET

Date: 
Sun, 04/20/2014 - 7:00pm - 9:00pm
Date: 
Tue, 04/22/2014 - 7:30pm - 9:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA STAGE
Event Type: 
Concert

We are delighted to present  two concerts by the wonderful JACK Quartet. Comprising violinists Christopher Otto and Ari Streisfeld, violist John Pickford Richards, and cellist Kevin McFarland, JACK is focused on the commissioning and performance of new works. 

Concert 1 takes place on Sunday 20th April at 7:00pm with recent works from their repetoire for string quartet and string quartet with electronics. Concert 2 takes place on Tuesday 22nd April at 7.30pm with new works by Stanford Composers for string quartet and string quartet with electronics.

 


FREE
Open to the Public

Dana Massie - Sample rate conversion with MaxSRC

Date: 
Wed, 04/16/2014 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA, 2nd floor, Rm 217
Event Type: 
Colloquium
 

A digital method for sample rate conversion using recursive IIR “phasor” filters, denoted MaxSRC, named in honor of Max Mathews whose work popularized the term “phasor filter". High quality sample rate conversion is useful for many applications in computer audio and music, including sound synthesis and sampled waveform playback. The most common methods used historically for sample rate conversion use FIR filters. MaxSRC uses time-varying IIR filters. 

Open to the Public
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Recent News

Mansion of Music, The Stanford Daily

Mansion of Music

May 1st, 2012, Raymond Luong, The Stanford Daily

It has been described by Stanford students as everything from a Spanish mansion to a Gothic fortress and even a haunted castle, but these misconceptions strike far from the truth. Perched on top of a hill behind Florence Moore Hall, this mysterious Stanford landmark is none other than the Knoll, currently home to Stanford’s Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA, pronounced “karma”).

Chris Carlson and Borderlands, Amazing-Looking Granular Sampler

Borderlands, Amazing-Looking Granular Sampler, and Beautiful Sound

April 19th, 2012,  Peter Kirn, Create Digital Music

How do you visualize the invisible? How do expose a process with multiple parameters in a way that’s straightforward and musically intuitive? Can messing about with granular sound feel like touching that sound – something untouchable? Creator Chris Carlson is publishing source code and a presentation for the NIME conference.

Mike Gao's Elaborate Musical Inventions: The Creators Project

Mike Gao is by all means a part of the beat movement in LA. He produces beats, performs them live, and interacts within one of the most prolific electronic music communities in the world today. But Gao takes it a step further. He has an arguably deeper understanding of his equipment than any other producer on the scene.

Miriam Kolar and "Haunting Sounds at an Ancient Peruvian Site"

Haunting Sounds at an Ancient Peruvian Site

February 16th, 2012,  Dan Ferber, Science Now

... Chavín de Huantar is particularly well suited to the study of ancient uses of sound, says Miriam Kolar, an archeoacoustics researcher at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. That’s because the interior architecture contains elaborate, multilevel mazes with long corridors and staircases that affect acoustics today and are well enough preserved to detect what the original residents must have heard...

Chris Chafe and "The Sounds of Science" - Stanford Magazine

The Sounds of Science

January/February 2012,  Roberta Kwok, Stanford Magazine

Composer Chris Chafe gives new meaning to synthesizing data.

At first, the music playing on Chris Chafe's laptop sounds like wind blowing through an old window frame. Then it becomes more frantic, reaching higher and higher pitches, with syncopated pops punctuating the wailing. The anxious chattering sounds almost human, like a sped-up movie reel. Suddenly, it slips into a deadened hum...
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