Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics

Summer Workshops 2015 Announced!

2015 Summer Workshop lineup announced! Check https://ccrma.stanford.edu/workshops for details. Register http://app.certain.com/profile/form/index.cfm?PKformID=0x1979858dec1.

Upcoming Events

[Internal Research Colloquium] May 6th: John Granzow/Tim O'Brien/Darius Mostowfi/Jonathan Abel, Fernando Lopez-Lezcano, Eoin Callery/Jonathan Abel

Date: 
Wed, 05/06/2015 - 5:15pm - 6:45pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom (Room 217)
Event Type: 
Internal Colloquium
Please join us for three conference-style presentations from 1) John Granzow, Tim O'Brien, Darius Mostowfi, and Jonathan Abel; 2) Fernando Lopez-Lezcano; and 3) Eoin Callery and Jonathan Abel.

John Granzow, Tim O'Brien, Darius Mostowfi, and Jonathan Abel: An Open-Source Spherical Microphone Array Design
We present a spherically baffled 32 channel microphone array for spatial sound recording. Mechanical, acoustical, electrical and computational challenges are discussed.

Fernando Lopez-Lezcano: NaN2 (Not a Number Squared): facing the music
FREE
Open to the Public

Don Knuth: Constraint-based composition

Date: 
Thu, 05/07/2015 - 5:15pm - 6:15pm
Location: 
CCRMA Stage
Event Type: 
Guest Lecture
Don Knuth will come and discuss/explain the peculiar(?) methods that he is using as he tries to compose a major work for pipe organ.
Biography
FREE
Open to the Public

Making Speech Content Sound Better

Date: 
Fri, 05/08/2015 - 11:30am - 1:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Seminar Room
Event Type: 
Hearing Seminar
CCRMA alumnus and Adobe Researcher, Gautham Mysore will lead Friday’s Hearing Seminar with a discussion about how we can improve the quality of audio. Professional quality audio is not trivial to create. Can we build tools that make it easier?

Last week at the CCRMA Hearing Seminar we talked about how to measure the quality of a speech signal. This week we talk about how to make it sound better.

Who: Gautham Mysore
What: Making Speech Content Better
When: Friday May 8 at 11:30AM
Where: CCRMA Seminar Room
Why: Because better audio quality is always better

Title:
FREE
Open to the Public
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Recent Events

Undergraduate Composers' Concert Featuring St. Lawrence String Quartet

Date: 
Fri, 04/10/2015 - 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA Stage, The Knoll
Event Type: 
Concert
The world-renowned and irresistibly exuberant St. Lawrence String Quartet in a CCRMA concert championing music of Stanford undergraduate student composers: John Ahern, Jason Griffin, Lennart Jansson and Benjamin Salman. 
FREE
Open to the Public

John Woodruff on Machine Listening: What do they hear and why?

Date: 
Fri, 04/10/2015 - 11:30am - 12:45pm
Location: 
CCRMA Seminar Room (Top Floor of the Knoll)
Event Type: 
Hearing Seminar
Whenever our devices capture sound, audio systems are there to recognize what’s been said or turn down all that noise. But how do our phones, tablets, remotes, headphones, hearing aids and thermostats know what to listen to? Most systems use one or both of two assumptions – 1) I’m listening for speech, 2) the sound I want came from that direction. Robust speech recognition systems are perhaps the most ubiquitous realizations of the first assumption. Large-scale training on noisy speech embeds the capability to “listen for speech”, but such systems are fundamentally limited when there are competing talkers.
FREE
Open to the Public

Hans Tutschku: Connection of Gesture and Space

Date: 
Wed, 04/08/2015 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
The Stage
Event Type: 
Guest Colloquium

The physical gesture of instrumentalists and dancers has been of great interest to me over the past 25 years. My musical education on the piano and later with live-electronics taught me aspects of music-making long before I thought to compose. Any music I have written, be it for instruments, singers or electronic sources, is searching for the expression of gestural phrasing, relationships between cause and effect (and their negation) and a plausibility carried over from our experiences outside of music.

Open to the Public

Xavier Serra - Music Information Retrieval from a Multicultural Perspective

Date: 
Mon, 04/06/2015 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom
Event Type: 
Guest Colloquium
Music is a universal phenomenon that manifests itself in every cultural context with a particular personality and the technologies supporting music have to take into account the specificities that every musical culture might have. This is particularly evident in the field of Music Information Retrieval, in which we aim at developing technologies to analyse, describe and explore any type of music. From this perspective we started the project CompMusic (http://compmusic.upf.edu) in which we focus on a number of MIR problems through the study of five music cultures: Hindustani (North India), Carnatic (South India), Turkish-makam (Turkey), Arab-Andalusian (Maghreb), and Beijing Opera (China).
FREE
Open to the Public
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Recent News

Return to Mars: Feature in Stanford Magazine

More than thirty years after its debut—as the soundtrack to footage of the red planet from the Viking missions—a historic piece of computer music has been restored by its Stanford creators.

Press Buzz for Jonathan Berger

What a great collection of articles about Jonathan Berger and his opera première and the Music and the Brain Symposium! Enjoy.

I Care if You Listen April 11, 2013
I Care if You Listen April 25, 2013
I Care if You Listen April 27, 2013
KDFC State of the Arts (SOTA) April 8, 2013

Bleeding-Edge Musical Innovation, Live from CCRMA; Full Report, Monolake + Tarik Barri Live

Create Digital Music featured recent events and people at CCRMA centered on the Modulations event series.  Thanks to CCRMA community member and CDM writer Gina Collecchia for the great writeup.

http://createdigitalmusic.com/2013/05/bleeding-edge-musical-innovation-l...

Music Gaming and Neuroplasticity at CCRMA

Students in Music 257, taught by Stanford consultin professor and Dolby Labs Senior Staff Scientist Poppy Crum, studied musical games with an eye toward increasing neuroplasticity. Take a look at this video.
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