Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics

Summer Workshops 2015 Announced!

2015 Summer Workshop lineup announced! Check https://ccrma.stanford.edu/workshops for details. Register http://app.certain.com/profile/form/index.cfm?PKformID=0x1979858dec1.

Hans Tutschku @ CCRMA: 4/6 ... 4/10 2015

04/08: Colloquium, Listening Room: Connection of Gesture and Space
04/10: Concert, Braun Rehearsal Hall: Electroacoustic Works (with a full deployment of our 3D speaker array)
Music 222 master classes

Upcoming Events

Robert Henke: Finding a New Audiovisual Language Using Lasers and Sound

Date: 
Wed, 04/01/2015 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
Knoll Stage
Event Type: 
Colloquium
Robert Henke talks about his laser based performance project Lumière II which just premiered at Centre George Pompidou in Paris, and provides insight into the artistic and technical challenges of the project.

Artist Bio:

Robert Henke, born 1969 in Munich, Germany, builds and operates machines that create sounds, shapes and structures.
FREE
Open to the Public

Robert Henke shares his favorite sound design tricks with Ableton Live and Max4Live

Date: 
Sat, 04/04/2015 - 10:00am - 4:00pm
Location: 
Knoll Stage, Stanford University Campus
Event Type: 
Guest Lecture

A software as complex as Ableton Live offers many ways to manipulate sound. Some are obvious and some are hidden. Robert Henke shows some examples of creative work with the software, and provides insight into more complex and iterative processes involved in his work flow. The workshop will also deal with questions of sound quality, the idea of 'good sound' and how to achieve this in a real world situation during a performance. In the second part of the workshop Robert Henke will dive into some of his Max4Live devices and will discuss the reasoning for developing own patches or tools. When does it help the creative process and when does it become a distraction?

FREE
Open to the Public

Xavier Serra - Music Information Retrieval from a Multicultural Perspective

Date: 
Mon, 04/06/2015 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom
Event Type: 
Guest Colloquium
Music is a universal phenomenon that manifests itself in every cultural context with a particular personality and the technologies supporting music have to take into account the specificities that every musical culture might have. This is particularly evident in the field of Music Information Retrieval, in which we aim at developing technologies to analyse, describe and explore any type of music. From this perspective we started the project CompMusic (http://compmusic.upf.edu) in which we focus on a number of MIR problems through the study of five music cultures: Hindustani (North India), Carnatic (South India), Turkish-makam (Turkey), Arab-Andalusian (Maghreb), and Beijing Opera (China).
FREE
Open to the Public
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Recent Events

Gautham Mysore - Hello Again CCRMA - Machine Learning and Signal Processing for Real-World Audio Applications

Date: 
Mon, 02/09/2015 - 5:15pm - 6:15pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom (Room 217)
Event Type: 
Guest Colloquium
After several years at CCRMA as a graduate student followed by several years in industry, it’s great to be back as a consulting assistant professor. In this talk, I will re-introduce myself, discuss various research projects that I have been working on, and discuss how I can work with CCRMA students on research projects. My research has spanned a number of areas including source separation, speech enhancement, music information retrieval, audio for video production, and audio event detection. A great deal of this work has been in close collaboration with graduate students. I’m most excited about developing new machine learning and signal processing algorithms for real-world audio applications.

Bio:
FREE
Open to the Public

Dimitri Bouche - Scheduling & Time Structures in Computer­ Assisted Composition

Date: 
Wed, 02/04/2015 - 5:15pm - 6:15pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom
Event Type: 
Guest Colloquium
Music composers’ work with computers is generally divided in the two distinct stages of composition and performance. Each stage requires specific methodology and software: computer-­aided composition involves time and high computation capabilities to produce complex musical scores, while performance and live rendering require reactive environments with precise real‐time constraints. Contemporary music composers permanently challenge these kinds of established categories, using unusual objects and behaviors in their music or considering the variations in performance as an actual part of the composition.
FREE
Open to the Public

Internal Colloquium - Rapid Fire Talks

Date: 
Wed, 01/28/2015 - 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom
Event Type: 
Internal Colloquium
This week's internal colloquium will feature a series of "rapid fire talks" given by some of CCRMA's grad students and faculty.
FREE
Open to the Public

An interactive interface for predominant pitch extraction, and its applications in singing evaluation, source separation and cover-version generation.

Date: 
Tue, 01/27/2015 - 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA Seminar Room [Knoll 315]
Event Type: 
DSP Seminar

Dr. Vishweshwara Rao, 
SensiBol Audio Technologies 

FREE
Open to the Public
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Recent News

Music Gaming and Neuroplasticity at CCRMA

Students in Music 257, taught by Stanford consultin professor and Dolby Labs Senior Staff Scientist Poppy Crum, studied musical games with an eye toward increasing neuroplasticity. Take a look at this video.

This is Your Brain on Opera

New York Times article: Jonathan Berger's "Visitations" Premiére at Stanford.
PALO ALTO, Calif. — I attended two performances of Jonathan Berger’s “Visitations” at the Bing Concert Hall at Stanford last week here. On Friday evening I sat in the primary motor cortex. The following night, my seat was located off to the side, in Broca’s area.
“Visitations,” a double bill of one-act operas about auditory hallucinations, mixes digital sounds with live voices and a chamber ensemble.

Sound Makers Unite at Stanford

From the Make Blog: This weekend I went down to Palo Alto to check out the DIY Musical Instrument Tailgate Party, hosted by Thingamajigs and the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA).

The fun, welcoming event was an amplified (pun intended) meetup, where makers could show off their projects and prototypes to each other. The public was invited to interact with the makers and the instruments and there were several performances throughout the afternoon as well. Read more here...

More than a Stanford concert hall, Bing is a high-tech music research lab

Like a well-designed sports car, Stanford's new Bing Concert Hall looks great from the outside but is even more impressive when you peer under the hood. And Feb. 15-16, Bing's high-tech engine will shift into overdrive when the groundbreaking electronic musicians of Stanford's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) showcase their latest works. Read more...

(Stanford News article by Nate Sloan)

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