Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics

Summer Workshops 2015 Announced!

2015 Summer Workshop lineup announced! Check https://ccrma.stanford.edu/workshops for details. Register http://app.certain.com/profile/form/index.cfm?PKformID=0x1979858dec1.

Upcoming Events

From simulation to auralization to virtual auditory displays

Date: 
Fri, 07/24/2015 - 11:00am - 12:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA Seminar Room
Event Type: 
Hearing Seminar

From simulation to auralization to virtual auditory displays
Michael Vorländer

 

FREE
Open to the Public
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Recent Events

Pat Scandalis - Physically Modeled Musical Instruments on Mobile Devices

Date: 
Thu, 05/21/2015 - 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Location: 
Classroom
Event Type: 
Guest Colloquium
Handheld mobile computing devices are now ubiquitous. These devices are powerful, connected and equipped with a variety of sensors. Their pervasiveness has created an opportunity to realize parametrically controlled, physically modeled, virtual musical instruments. moForte inc was founded to develop a line of sonic and musical applications for handheld devices. We developed the "moForte Guitar Stack" which models the guitar family of instruments. This stack has been used to used to develop applications for mobile devices.

We give an overview of the history of physical modeling with many sound examples, and then brief overview of the current state of modeling on mobile devices using a few apps based on the moForte Guitar Stack.
FREE
Open to the Public

[Guest Colloquium] May 20th: Juan Pampin and Ake Parmerud

Date: 
Wed, 05/20/2015 - 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom (Room 217)
Event Type: 
Guest Colloquium
Please join us for a pre-concert lecture by Åke Parmerud and Juan Pampin – both masters of ambisonics and multichannel composition. They will speaking about their compositions and work in spatialized audio before the concerts at the Bing concert hall on Wednesday and Thursday (May 20th and 21st).

Åke Parmerud and Juan Pampin visits and lectures are supported by generous funding from the Ben and A. Jess Shenson Funds at Stanford University.
FREE
Open to the Public

Compositional models for audio processing

Date: 
Fri, 05/15/2015 - 11:30am - 1:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Seminar Room (Top Floor of the Knoll)
Event Type: 
Hearing Seminar
Compositional models of audio, including those based on non-negative matrix factorisation (NMF), explicitly consider the fact that sound components combine largely constructively in the composition of more complex sounds. The use of compositional models has yielded state-of-the-art results in many audio processing tasks, such as sound source separation and music content analysis. In this presentation, I will give an overview of compositional model approaches to noise-robust automatic speech recognition (ASR) and discuss methods to build a dictionary of sound components. I will then show how compositional models can also be used to learn recurrent acoustic patterns representing words or phrases, with as application the construction of a language-independent vocal interface.
FREE
Open to the Public

Troy Rogers - The MEARIS Concept: Making Music with Modular Electro-Acoustic Robotic Instrument Systems

Date: 
Thu, 05/14/2015 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Stage
Event Type: 
Guest Lecture
In this presentation, Rogers will discuss various aspects of his creative work with musical robots and other devices, with a focus on hybrid robotic instrument systems in which the robotic aspect can function as an automatically tunable acoustic filter as well as acoustic sound source, a scenario which gives rise to increased parametric depth and expressive potential.

FREE
Open to the Public
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Recent News

Holly Herndon's New Single Named Best New Track on Pitchfork

Congratulations to our own Holly Herndon, once again in the news!

"In reviewing electronic music composer Holly Herndon’s breakout debut, 2012's Movement, we noted her penchant for "Bending one person's voice into phantasmagorias", which continues on her newest, breath-halting single, “Chorus”." Read more, and watch video here...

Turning brain waves into music helps spot seizures

The music is eerie, if not altogether aesthetically pleasing. Like a soundtrack moments before a film's horrifying twist, the sounds of the brain in a state of seizure betrays the plot with little more than a skin-prickling crescendo.
 
This music, the electrical activity of the seizing brain translated to sound, is a merger of art and medicine, the work of Stanford's Dr. Josef Parvizi, an epilepsy specialist, and Chris Chafe, a composer and music researcher. 

Tricking the brain

Most interns don’t deliberately try to deceive executives at their employer’s company, but Dolby intern Jimmy Tobin was asked to do just that.
 
For a reception following a day of meetings for the company’s 90 top leaders, Tobin, a student of symbolic systems at Stanford University, and fellow interns working in the Science Group with Senior Staff Scientist Poppy Crum were asked to create a series of demonstrations of perceptual illusions.

Stanford scientists build a 'brain stethoscope' to turn seizures into music

When Chris Chafe and Josef Parvizi began transforming recordings of brain activity into music, they did so with artistic aspirations. The professors soon realized, though, that the work could lead to a powerful biofeedback tool for identifying brain patterns associated with seizures. Read more here...
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