Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics

Summer Workshops 2015 Announced!

2015 Summer Workshop lineup announced! Check https://ccrma.stanford.edu/workshops for details. Register http://app.certain.com/profile/form/index.cfm?PKformID=0x1979858dec1.

Upcoming Events

François-Xavier Féron - Retracing the impact of musical acoustics on Gérard Grisey’s creative process in the 1970s: from spectral models to spectrogram transcriptions

Date: 
Wed, 05/27/2015 - 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Location: 
Classroom
Event Type: 
Guest Colloquium

From its emergence in France at the beginning of the 1970s, spectral music has represented one of the main musical streams. Composed by Gérard Grisey over a decade, from 1974 to 1985, the six-piece cycle Les espaces acoustiques illustrates a new approach towards composition, one that deals with acoustic properties and is constantly preoccupied with the modalities of auditory perception. This cycle is based on a harmonic spectrum with fundamental frequency 41,2 Hz (E1). Grisey also collaborated with the acoustician Michèle Castellengo, with whom he analysed instrumental sounds spectrograms in order to compose "synthetic spectra" and "spectral polyphony".

FREE
Open to the Public

Loren Mach Performing Work By Alex Chechile, Alexandra Hay, and Holly Herndon

Date: 
Wed, 05/27/2015 - 7:30pm - 9:00pm
Location: 
Bing Concert Hall Studio
Event Type: 
Concert
Loren Mach will perform new music for percussion and multichannel electronics by Stanford Graduate Composers Alex Chechile, Alexandra Hay, and Holly Herndon.

Loren Mach is passionate about the arts as they relate to our 21st century world and all who inhabit it. A graduate of the Oberlin and Cincinnati Conservatories of Music, he has premiered countless solo, chamber, and orchestral works.
FREE
Open to the Public

Wet Ink

Date: 
Thu, 05/28/2015 - 7:00pm - 9:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA STAGE
Event Type: 
Concert

FREE
Open to the Public
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Recent Events

Naomi Harte - ViSQOL, An objective measure for speech quality

Date: 
Fri, 05/01/2015 - 11:30am - 1:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Seminar Room (Top Floor of the Knoll)
Event Type: 
Hearing Seminar
How do humans judge perceptual quality of a signal? It’s easy to measure mean-squared error, but that is not how the brain measures quality—that would be too easy. Instead, we want to look inside the brain to see how sound is encoded. This problem is important as we build more devices that process sound and we need to assess whether they are doing a good job. Naomi’s work addresses the problem when we have access to the original and the modified sound. It’s an improvement over the PESQ and POLQA work, if you are familiar with the area.

FREE
Open to the Public

Acoustic Source Localization in Wireless Sensor Networks: Model and Numerical Algorithm

Date: 
Thu, 04/30/2015 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom [Knoll 217]
Event Type: 
DSP Seminar

Acoustic Source Localization in Wireless Sensor Networks: Model and Numerical Algorithm

Abstract: Jianhua Yuan will present a series of techniques, based upon the energy based acoustic features, to locate a sound source given measurements of the sound field. For wireless ad hoc sensor network applications, energy based acoustic features is an appropriate choice since the acoustic power emitted by targets, such as moving vehicles usually varies slowly with respect to time. In this approach, mathematical models and new numerical methods may be used to yield higher accuracy in terms of source location estimates compared to the earlier method.
 

FREE
Open to the Public

Application of Acoustics for Underwater ROVs

Date: 
Wed, 04/29/2015 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom
Event Type: 
Colloquium

Signaling and navigating in the underwater world presents challenges for traditional approaches such as radio waves and light. Both are readily absorbed in water. Light also tends to scatter and reflect over short distances. Sound waves are much more adaptable to use in this world. While they also present challenges – especially absorption and reflection – they can be used effectively over much greater distances in the order of kilometers.

 

FREE
Open to the Public

Gabriella Musacchia on Brain Plasticity with Music and Auditory Enrichment

Date: 
Fri, 04/24/2015 - 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Location: 
TBD: CCRMA Seminar Room or the classroom
Event Type: 
Hearing Seminar
Brain plasticity with music and auditory enrichment: Implications for early music education. Note special time!!!!! 3PM Seminar!!!
FREE
Open to the Public
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Recent News

Tricking the brain

Most interns don’t deliberately try to deceive executives at their employer’s company, but Dolby intern Jimmy Tobin was asked to do just that.
 
For a reception following a day of meetings for the company’s 90 top leaders, Tobin, a student of symbolic systems at Stanford University, and fellow interns working in the Science Group with Senior Staff Scientist Poppy Crum were asked to create a series of demonstrations of perceptual illusions.

Stanford scientists build a 'brain stethoscope' to turn seizures into music

When Chris Chafe and Josef Parvizi began transforming recordings of brain activity into music, they did so with artistic aspirations. The professors soon realized, though, that the work could lead to a powerful biofeedback tool for identifying brain patterns associated with seizures. Read more here...

The Stanford Ph.D Student Making Human Music with a Laptop

When it comes to music-making, laptops get a bad rap. They're cold, impersonal, inexpressive, and can't summon the warmth of traditional acoustic instruments. Or at least that's one way to look at it. Experimental musician Holly Herndon disagrees — and has spent much of her career exploring the expressive potential of the machines that are now an inseparable part of modern life. Read more here...

CCRMA's Rob Hamilton at Design Night

Our very own Rob Hamilton, along with his partner in crime Chris Platz, was at a recent Design Night at the Autodesk Gallery in San Francisco. Rob and Chris were displaying their gaming-inspired work "Echo Canyon." Read more here.
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