Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics

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Upcoming Events

Effects of cognitive load on perception

Date: 
Fri, 05/29/2015 - 11:00am - 12:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA Seminar Room
Event Type: 
Hearing Seminar
How is it that we recognize audio, in impoverished environments?  How does our cognitive state, and the load our brains are suffering under, effect how we perceive and understand audio? Speech gives us a convenient model to talk about syntax, but the same considerations probably apply to music.  While this talk describes a speech paradigm, I believe it applies to all forms of auditory perception. 

   Who: Sven Mattys (University of York, UK)
   What: Effects of cognitive load on perception
   When: May 29, 2015 at 11AM
   Where: CCRMA Seminar Room
   Why: Because perception depends on cognition
FREE
Open to the Public
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Recent Events

Undergraduate Composers' Concert Featuring St. Lawrence String Quartet

Date: 
Fri, 04/10/2015 - 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA Stage, The Knoll
Event Type: 
Concert
The world-renowned and irresistibly exuberant St. Lawrence String Quartet in a CCRMA concert championing music of Stanford undergraduate student composers: John Ahern, Jason Griffin, Lennart Jansson and Benjamin Salman. 
FREE
Open to the Public

John Woodruff on Machine Listening: What do they hear and why?

Date: 
Fri, 04/10/2015 - 11:30am - 12:45pm
Location: 
CCRMA Seminar Room (Top Floor of the Knoll)
Event Type: 
Hearing Seminar
Whenever our devices capture sound, audio systems are there to recognize what’s been said or turn down all that noise. But how do our phones, tablets, remotes, headphones, hearing aids and thermostats know what to listen to? Most systems use one or both of two assumptions – 1) I’m listening for speech, 2) the sound I want came from that direction. Robust speech recognition systems are perhaps the most ubiquitous realizations of the first assumption. Large-scale training on noisy speech embeds the capability to “listen for speech”, but such systems are fundamentally limited when there are competing talkers.
FREE
Open to the Public

Hans Tutschku: Connection of Gesture and Space

Date: 
Wed, 04/08/2015 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
The Stage
Event Type: 
Guest Colloquium

The physical gesture of instrumentalists and dancers has been of great interest to me over the past 25 years. My musical education on the piano and later with live-electronics taught me aspects of music-making long before I thought to compose. Any music I have written, be it for instruments, singers or electronic sources, is searching for the expression of gestural phrasing, relationships between cause and effect (and their negation) and a plausibility carried over from our experiences outside of music.

Open to the Public

Xavier Serra - Music Information Retrieval from a Multicultural Perspective

Date: 
Mon, 04/06/2015 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom
Event Type: 
Guest Colloquium
Music is a universal phenomenon that manifests itself in every cultural context with a particular personality and the technologies supporting music have to take into account the specificities that every musical culture might have. This is particularly evident in the field of Music Information Retrieval, in which we aim at developing technologies to analyse, describe and explore any type of music. From this perspective we started the project CompMusic (http://compmusic.upf.edu) in which we focus on a number of MIR problems through the study of five music cultures: Hindustani (North India), Carnatic (South India), Turkish-makam (Turkey), Arab-Andalusian (Maghreb), and Beijing Opera (China).
FREE
Open to the Public
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