Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics

Summer Workshops 2015 Announced!

2015 Summer Workshop lineup announced! Check https://ccrma.stanford.edu/workshops for details. Register http://app.certain.com/profile/form/index.cfm?PKformID=0x1979858dec1.

Hans Tutschku @ CCRMA: 4/6 ... 4/10 2015

04/08: Colloquium, Listening Room: Connection of Gesture and Space
04/10: Concert, Braun Rehearsal Hall: Electroacoustic Works (with a full deployment of our 3D speaker array)
Music 222 master classes.

Upcoming Events

Hans Tutschku: Electroacoustic Works

Date: 
Fri, 04/10/2015 - 7:30pm - 9:00pm
Location: 
Braun Rehearsal Hall
Event Type: 
Concert
With an impressive catalogue of compositions, including a collection of engaging multimedia productions, Hans Tutschku - faculty member and director of the electroacoustic studios at Harvard University - uses precise craftmanship in compositional techniques to allow the listener "to hear only the voice of the music he has created and not the technology". CCRMA is proud to feature this concert of Tutschku's electroacoustic music works, including some of his most recent compositions.
FREE
Open to the Public

The Lightbulb Ensemble

Date: 
Tue, 04/14/2015 - 7:30pm - 9:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA STAGE
Event Type: 
Concert
FREE
Open to the Public

Naomi Harte - ViSQOL, An objective measure for speech quality

Date: 
Fri, 05/01/2015 - 11:30am - 1:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Seminar Room (Top Floor of the Knoll)
Event Type: 
Hearing Seminar
This talk gives an overview of ViSQOL – the Virtual Speech Quality Objective Listener. It is a signal-based, full-reference, intrusive metric that models human speech quality perception using a spectro-temporal measure of similarity between a reference and a test speech signal. The metric has been designed to be particularly robust for quality issues associated with Voice over IP (VoIP) transmission. The talk will explore how the original idea for associating visual similarity with spectrogram changes developed. I’ll show results from a full evaluation of the metric against PESQ and POLQA in a range of scenarios, including how it handles VoIP degradations. The research to develop ViSQOL was sponsored by Google Chrome in Mountainview CA.   Bio: Dr.
FREE
Open to the Public
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Recent Events

Sound Classification by Prof. Dan Ellis (Columbia)

Date: 
Fri, 03/13/2015 - 11:00am - 12:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA Seminar Room
Event Type: 
Hearing Seminar

I’m happy to welcome Prof. Dan Ellis (from Columbia, and on sabbatical at Google) to Stanford CCRMA to talk about recognizing environmental sounds. Recognizing speech and music are relatively common applications of machine learning. But what about the rest of the world? Speech and music are only a small fraction of the sounds that we hear throughout our day.

Dan Ellis has been at the intersection of speech recognition, audio analysis and music processing research throughout his career. He brings an unusual range of interests and skills to all three problems, and I highly recommend his work.

FREE
Open to the Public

Joseph Anderson: The Epiphanie Sequence OR A Few Thoughts on the Reflexive Moment in Acousmatic Music

Date: 
Thu, 03/12/2015 - 5:15pm - 6:45pm
Location: 
CCRMA Listening Room
Event Type: 
Guest Colloquium

In the age of High Fidelity audio transmission, storage and reproduction, the Western Art Music Tradition has tended to regard the apparatus as a silent or invisible component of the art, particularly in the performance context of what was once called "tape music". One notion, being that the ideal art music is pure: without media, without embodiment, and without the intervention and corruption of performers or performance. In publicly staged "tape music" events, audiences usually see loudspeakers dressed in black, with the intention of fading into darkness.

FREE
Open to the Public

VELA 6911 - A MULTIMEDIA PIECE BY VICTOR GAMA

Date: 
Fri, 03/06/2015 - 7:30pm - 9:00pm
Location: 
Dinkelspiel Auditorium
Event Type: 
Concert

VELA 6911

A MULTIMEDIA PIECE BY CCRMA VISITING ARTIST VICTOR GAMA

with

THE STANFORD NEW ENSEMBLE

JINDONG CAI - CONDUCTOR
VICTOR GAMA - ACRUX, TOHA, DINO, COMPOSITION, VIDEO DAVID GRUNZWEIG TOHA
CHRIS CHAFE - CELETO
JOHN GRANDZOW - DAXOPHONE
ALISON RUSH - CETACANT
ALVARO BARBOSA - RADIAL STRING CHIMES
DAVID KERR - VIDEO TECHNOLOGY

FREE FOR SUID HOLDERS

Advanced Topics in Video Game Audio: Leonard J. Paul

Date: 
Thu, 03/05/2015 - 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom
Event Type: 
Guest Lecture
Composer, Sound Designer and Educator Leonard J. Paul visits CCRMA to present his work with procedural audio, generative music systems and Pure Data in the context of developing innovative audio and music systems for gaming. 

Bring your lunch and learn more about how interactive audio and music programming skills can be put to use in the world of game audio and music.

BIO:

FREE
Open to the Public
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Recent News

Palette of sound: Triple CCRMAlite’s excursion through time

The Triple CCRMAlite performance this past Sunday at Bing Concert Hall was a celebration of three important dates for the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA): the 40th anniversary of CCRMA, the 50th anniversary of the first computer program for music on campus, and the 80th birthday of CCRMA founder John Chowning Ph.D. ’66. The program featured a science fair of student research in the lobby, as well as a concert showcasing works from Chowning, French composer Jean-Claude Risset, and former CCRMA Research Associate Bill Schottstaedt.
 
Read more here...

The creativity of 'karma'

Palo Alto Weekly writer Nick Veronin takes a look at recent work being done at CCRMA and profiles the upcoming "Designing Musical Games::Gaming Musical Design", "New Music Controllers" and "3D Printing for Acoustics" Summer Workshops.


Read more here...

Review: Auditory Hallucinations, Composed

Congratulations to Jonathan Berger for more great reviews of his "Visitations!"

How Music Hijacks Our Perception of Time

Very interesting article by Dr. Jonathan Berger! "One evening, some 40 years ago, I got lost in time. I was at a performance of Schubert’s String Quintet in C major. During the second movement I had the unnerving feeling that time was literally grinding to a halt. The sensation was powerful, visceral, overwhelming. It was a life-changing moment, or, as it felt at the time, a life-changing eon.
 
It has been my goal ever since to compose music that usurps the perceived flow of time and commandeers the sense of how time passes. Although I’ve learned to manipulate subjective time, I still stand in awe of Schubert’s unparalleled power.
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