Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics

CCRMA Summer Workshops 2014

CCRMA Summer Workshops have been scheduled for 2014. Full schedule, links to detailed sites, and registration information can be found by clicking here. Come join us at CCRMA this summer!

Upcoming Events

There are no events currently scheduled. Please check again soon.
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Recent Events

Charles Gadeken and the students of ME289: Interactive Art and Performance Design

Date: 
Wed, 05/28/2014 - 5:15pm - 7:05pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom
Event Type: 
Colloquium
Charles Gadeken has been working as a professional artist in the Bay Area for 20 years. His artistic practice seeks to realize the potential for unexpected magic and serendipity in everyday life. His art pulls inspiration from objects, structures and natural processes in the world around us, and transforms them into beautifully crafted sculptures that engage and surprise the viewer. His goal through this work is to instill a sense of play into the environment, taking the form of things we tend to overlook and remaking them as magical items that exist as a real life portal to our imagination.
Open to the Public

Martin Roth presents the Tannhäuser PD compiler

Date: 
Wed, 05/28/2014 - 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom
Event Type: 
Concert
CCRMA welcomes Martin Roth to present his recent work on the Tannhäuser compiler for Pure Data, as well as his unique perspective on creating mobile interactive music software powered by PD with RjDj.
FREE
Open to the Public

Elision Ensemble

Date: 
Sat, 05/24/2014 - 7:30pm - 10:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA STAGE
Event Type: 
Concert
Elision Ensemble is Australia's premier new music ensemble. They are known throughout the world for their virtuosic live performances and recordings. So please join us for the first of two concerts on Saturday 24th at 7.30pm on the CCRMA stage. The program will include multi-media and live electronic works by Stanford Graduate Composers and pieces from Elision's concet repetoire.

The second concert takes place at The Bing Concert Hall on Wednesday 28th May at 7.30pm with more new Stanford multimeda works and Elision favorites.

FREE
Open to the Public

CCRMA Spring Concert

Date: 
Fri, 05/23/2014 - 7:30pm - 9:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA Stage
Event Type: 
Concert
Join CCRMA students, faculty and staff as they present new works of electronic, electroacoustic and computer music. Explore new paradigms of live performance and spatialization with an ecclectic program of new works by faculty, friends and students featuring compositions and performances by: 
 
Alex Chechile 
Madeline Huberth 
Shu Yu Lin 
Alvin Lucier 
Pablo Castellanos Macin 
Chryssie Nanou 
Rocco Di Pietro 
Hana Shin 
Ge Wang 
 
and more! 

 
FREE
Open to the Public
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Recent News

Stanford scientists build a 'brain stethoscope' to turn seizures into music

When Chris Chafe and Josef Parvizi began transforming recordings of brain activity into music, they did so with artistic aspirations. The professors soon realized, though, that the work could lead to a powerful biofeedback tool for identifying brain patterns associated with seizures. Read more here...

The Stanford Ph.D Student Making Human Music with a Laptop

When it comes to music-making, laptops get a bad rap. They're cold, impersonal, inexpressive, and can't summon the warmth of traditional acoustic instruments. Or at least that's one way to look at it. Experimental musician Holly Herndon disagrees — and has spent much of her career exploring the expressive potential of the machines that are now an inseparable part of modern life. Read more here...

CCRMA's Rob Hamilton at Design Night

Our very own Rob Hamilton, along with his partner in crime Chris Platz, was at a recent Design Night at the Autodesk Gallery in San Francisco. Rob and Chris were displaying their gaming-inspired work "Echo Canyon." Read more here.

Return to Mars: Feature in Stanford Magazine

More than thirty years after its debut—as the soundtrack to footage of the red planet from the Viking missions—a historic piece of computer music has been restored by its Stanford creators.
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