Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics

CCRMA Summer Workshops 2014

CCRMA Summer Workshops have been scheduled for 2014. Full schedule, links to detailed sites, and registration information can be found by clicking here. Come join us at CCRMA this summer!

Upcoming Events

JACK QUARTET

Date: 
Sun, 04/20/2014 - 7:00pm - 9:00pm
Date: 
Tue, 04/22/2014 - 7:30pm - 9:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA STAGE
Event Type: 
Concert

We are delighted to present  two concerts by the wonderful JACK Quartet. Comprising violinists Christopher Otto and Ari Streisfeld, violist John Pickford Richards, and cellist Kevin McFarland, JACK is focused on the commissioning and performance of new works. 

Concert 1 takes place on Sunday 20th April at 7:00pm with recent works from their repetoire for string quartet and string quartet with electronics. Concert 2 takes place on Tuesday 22nd April at 7.30pm with new works by Stanford Composers for string quartet and string quartet with electronics.

 


FREE
Open to the Public

François Germain: Towards practical source-independent algorithms using nonnegative matrix factorization

Date: 
Wed, 04/23/2014 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom, The Knoll 2nd floor, Rm 217
Event Type: 
Colloquium
Limitations of nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) were recently circumvented through the development of "universal source models" which exploit the similarities inside a given class of sources in order to eliminate the need for user-provided training data. The resulting system is unsupervised from the user perspective which strongly improves its range of practical use. This method was applied to applications such as offline speech enhancement, voice activity detection and singing voice separation. 

Full abstract:
Open to the Public
Syndicate content

Recent Events

JACK QUARTET

Date: 
Sun, 04/20/2014 - 7:00pm - 9:00pm
Date: 
Tue, 04/22/2014 - 7:30pm - 9:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA STAGE
Event Type: 
Concert

We are delighted to present  two concerts by the wonderful JACK Quartet. Comprising violinists Christopher Otto and Ari Streisfeld, violist John Pickford Richards, and cellist Kevin McFarland, JACK is focused on the commissioning and performance of new works. 

Concert 1 takes place on Sunday 20th April at 7:00pm with recent works from their repetoire for string quartet and string quartet with electronics. Concert 2 takes place on Tuesday 22nd April at 7.30pm with new works by Stanford Composers for string quartet and string quartet with electronics.

 


FREE
Open to the Public

Dana Massie - Sample rate conversion with MaxSRC

Date: 
Wed, 04/16/2014 - 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
CCRMA, 2nd floor, Rm 217
Event Type: 
Colloquium
 

A digital method for sample rate conversion using recursive IIR “phasor” filters, denoted MaxSRC, named in honor of Max Mathews whose work popularized the term “phasor filter". High quality sample rate conversion is useful for many applications in computer audio and music, including sound synthesis and sampled waveform playback. The most common methods used historically for sample rate conversion use FIR filters. MaxSRC uses time-varying IIR filters. 

Open to the Public

José Echeveste: Antescofo, a dynamic language for real-time musician-computer interaction

Date: 
Mon, 04/14/2014 - 5:15pm - 6:45pm
Location: 
CCRMA Classroom, The Knoll 2nd floor, Rm 217
Event Type: 
Colloquium
 
This talk focuses on programing of time and interaction in Antescofo, a real-time system for performance coordination between musicians and computer processes during live music performance. To this end, Antescofo relies on artificial machine listening and a domain specific real-time programing language. It extends each paradigm through strong coupling of the two and strong emphasis on temporal semantics and behavior of the system.

The challenge in bringing human actions in the loop of computing is strongly related to temporal semantics of the language, and timeliness of live execution despite heterogeneous nature of time in the two mediums.

FREE
Open to the Public

Everything you wanted to know about pitch perception....

Date: 
Fri, 04/11/2014 - 11:00am - 12:30pm
Location: 
CCRMA Seminar room
Event Type: 
Hearing Seminar
I want to review several theories of pitch perception this week at the CCRMA Hearing Seminar. There are models based on spectral profiles (obviously wrong :-), temporal models (too good), and engineering approaches (not perceptual). And even newer work on using learning. How can these approaches be combined to find something that always works? Something that explains human perception?

Who: Malcolm Slaney (CCRMA)
What: Everything you wanted to know about pitch perception
When: Friday April 11 at 11AM
Where: CCRMA Seminar Room (Top floor of the Knoll at Stanford)
Why: What is more fundamental than pitch?

Bring your ideas, and we’ll see if there is a middle ground.

FREE
Open to the Public
Syndicate content

Recent News

Review: Auditory Hallucinations, Composed

Congratulations to Jonathan Berger for more great reviews of his "Visitations!"

How Music Hijacks Our Perception of Time

Very interesting article by Dr. Jonathan Berger! "One evening, some 40 years ago, I got lost in time. I was at a performance of Schubert’s String Quintet in C major. During the second movement I had the unnerving feeling that time was literally grinding to a halt. The sensation was powerful, visceral, overwhelming. It was a life-changing moment, or, as it felt at the time, a life-changing eon.
 
It has been my goal ever since to compose music that usurps the perceived flow of time and commandeers the sense of how time passes. Although I’ve learned to manipulate subjective time, I still stand in awe of Schubert’s unparalleled power.

Holly Herndon's New Single Named Best New Track on Pitchfork

Congratulations to our own Holly Herndon, once again in the news!

"In reviewing electronic music composer Holly Herndon’s breakout debut, 2012's Movement, we noted her penchant for "Bending one person's voice into phantasmagorias", which continues on her newest, breath-halting single, “Chorus”." Read more, and watch video here...

Turning brain waves into music helps spot seizures

The music is eerie, if not altogether aesthetically pleasing. Like a soundtrack moments before a film's horrifying twist, the sounds of the brain in a state of seizure betrays the plot with little more than a skin-prickling crescendo.
 
This music, the electrical activity of the seizing brain translated to sound, is a merger of art and medicine, the work of Stanford's Dr. Josef Parvizi, an epilepsy specialist, and Chris Chafe, a composer and music researcher. 

Tricking the brain

Most interns don’t deliberately try to deceive executives at their employer’s company, but Dolby intern Jimmy Tobin was asked to do just that.
 
For a reception following a day of meetings for the company’s 90 top leaders, Tobin, a student of symbolic systems at Stanford University, and fellow interns working in the Science Group with Senior Staff Scientist Poppy Crum were asked to create a series of demonstrations of perceptual illusions.
Syndicate content