Hearing Seminars

CCRMA hosts a weekly Hearing seminar. All areas related to perception are discussed, but the group emphasizes topics that will help us understand how the auditory system works. Speakers are drawn from the group and visitors to the Stanford area. Most attendees are graduate students, faculty, or local researchers interested in psychology, music, engineering, neurophysiology, and linguistics. Meetings are usually from 11AM to 12:30 (or so, depending on questions) on Friday mornings in the CCRMA Seminar Room.

The current schedule is announced via a mailing list. To be added to the mailing list, send email to hearing-seminar-request@ccrma.stanford.edu.  If you have any questions, please contact Malcolm Slaney at hearing-seminar-admin@ccrma.stanford.edu.

Recent Hearing Seminars

  • Your Attention Please: Three important aspects of auditory attention

    Date: 
    Fri, 11/30/2012 - 1:15pm - 2:30pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA Seminar Room
    Event Type: 
    Hearing Seminar

    At the next CCRMA Hearing Seminar, I'd like to talk about recent work on auditory attention. As many of you know, I'm very interested in how our brains process sounds in complicated environments. Our ability to understand any speech in a noisy cacophony is known as the Cocktail Party Effect. We still don't have good models of how are brains do this task, but an important component of the process is certainly attention. 

    FREE
    Open to the Public
  • JJ Johnston on Soundfields: Acoustics vs. Human Hearing

    Date: 
    Fri, 10/26/2012 - 1:15pm - 2:30pm
    Location: 
    Seminar Room
    Event Type: 
    Hearing Seminar
    I'm very happy to announce that JJ Johnston, one of the principle forces behind the MP3 standard, will be leading the discussion at this week's Stanford CCRMA Hearing Seminar. JJ is widely known and respected for his wide-ranging work and thoughts on the perception of audio. He is only mildly opinionated.
    FREE
    Open to the Public
  • Prof. Takako Fujioka on Cortical Signatures of Melody and Rhythm Processing

    Date: 
    Fri, 10/05/2012 - 1:15pm - 2:30pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA Seminar Room
    Event Type: 
    Hearing Seminar

    I am pleased to (re)introduce Takako Fujioka to the Hearing Seminar. She spoke a year or two ago at CCRMA, and is now the newest member of the CCRMA faculty. She's interested in studying how our brains respond to music by measuring non-invasive signals such as those from EEG and MEG.
     

    FREE
    Open to the Public
  • Bernhard Ross - Neuromagnetic studies of auditory brain function

    Date: 
    Tue, 09/25/2012 - 1:15pm - 2:30pm
    Location: 
    Seminar Room
    Event Type: 
    Hearing Seminar

    I'm happy to introduce Bernhard Ross to the Hearing Seminar community.  Bernhard uses MEG (magnetoencephalography) to study the response of the brain to auditory stimuli.  He'll be talking about his work to understand concious perception, and how they change with aging and injury.

     

    FREE
    Open to the Public
  • Mike Mandel (Audience) - Reverberation is all around us, and yet little is understood about its effect

    Date: 
    Fri, 05/11/2012 - 1:15pm - 2:30pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA Seminar Room
    Event Type: 
    Hearing Seminar
    Echo, echo, echo, echo, and it's all reverberation.  It adds a lot of richness to our lives.. **and** it makes it really hard for machines to understand speech.
    FREE
    Open to the Public
  • Roy Patterson - Brain imaging of pitch perception and the problem of cochlear distortion

    Date: 
    Fri, 05/04/2012 - 1:15pm - 2:30pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA Seminar Room
    Event Type: 
    Hearing Seminar
    Ahh, pitch.  One of our favorite topics at the Hearing Seminar.  It seems like a simple problem... we know what pitch is, right? But it's not so simple, and modeling pitch still reflects one of the biggest controversies in auditory modeling.  Just how is it that we assign a pitch to a sound? The spectral and the temporal people have been fighting for years.
    FREE
    Open to the Public
  • Tom Walters - The Intervalgram: An Audio Feature for Large-scale Melody Recognition

    Date: 
    Fri, 04/27/2012 - 1:15pm - 2:30pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA Seminar Room
    Event Type: 
    Hearing Seminar
    Melody recognition is hard, not the least of the reasons because the song can be transposed and not change the basic melody. It is easy to consider all tranpositions, but this extra complexity is really an issue for large-scale melody recognition. Tom Walters, a research scientist at Google, will be talking about tests he has done to scale melody recognition to very large databases. I'm sure you can image why this might be important to Google. :-)

        Who:    Tom Walters (Google)
    FREE
    Open to the Public
  • Rui Wang - Recognizing Sounds

    Date: 
    Fri, 04/20/2012 - 1:15pm - 2:30pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA Seminar Room
    Event Type: 
    Hearing Seminar
    Just how do we recognize the sounds around us? For many decades the easy answer has been "a neural network."  But seriously, how?  What is it about a sound that allows us to recognize it? What does sound recognition tell us about how the brain is organized?  I think vowel recognition (and more generally speech and sound recognition) are a really interesting and hard problem. I'd like to know how the brain does it.  Perhaps that will allow us to conclusively describe what sounds are similar. 
    FREE
    Open to the Public
  • Improving representations of music audio for music information retrieval

    Date: 
    Fri, 04/13/2012 - 1:15pm - 2:30pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA Seminar Room
    Event Type: 
    Hearing Seminar
    There are lots of tools we'd like to build to analyze and respond to music. Denizens of the Hearing Seminar probably prefer an approach based on features. It's worked well for humans, why not make it work for machines? But machine-learning systems are agnostic---they use whatever data you give them. Much of the original work on music information retrieval was based on MFCC, a representation of speech that was designed for speech (based on perception) and throws away the pitch! How can one look at music and ignore, for example, the pitch?!?!?!?!
    FREE
    Open to the Public
  • Frederic Theunissen (UCB) - Invariant information in natural audition

    Date: 
    Fri, 03/16/2012 - 1:15pm - 2:30pm
    Location: 
    CCRMA Seminar Room
    Event Type: 
    Hearing Seminar
    Details to follow...
    FREE
    Open to the Public